romex inside greenfield

Can I have two 14/2 romex cables inside a 1/2" flexible conduit? Is this allowed? Any heat issues?
Thanks, Matt
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Have you tried fitting two short sections inside the Greenfield?

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Bob, I was able to fit two 6 ft. romex cables inside a 1/2" flexible conduit with no problems. There is still plenty of space left. I can't use Romex only because as far as I know, the local code doesn't allow the use of Romex cable in high rises.
I usually use MC cable, but in this particular case, it was easier because the conduit was already there.
Thanks..
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If it were me, I'd use stranded wire and some self-sticking wire markers.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You're misinterpreting the Code. The National Electrical Code doesn't permit the use of Romex *anywhere* in *any* building that exceeds three floors above grade. Unless your local enforcement authority has adopted a specific exception to this prohibition, you're violating the Code to use Romex, whether it's inside Greenfield or not.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I would laso use stranded wire. Romex or any soild wire is not intended to be pulled through conduits.
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Thanks everyone.
BTW, Rex Cauldwell's book "Wiring a House" mentions the use of romex in conduit; i.e. "The wiring inside the conduit can be NM or THHN/THWN..." He also says "At one time, code limited the number of floors on which a residence could use NM cable. Code no longer prohibits NM cable in a residence, regardless of height."
I asked my electrician about this, and he says they are trying to change the code on romex (probably local code), but haven't done it yet.
I'll be on the safe side and replace the romex. Thanks again.
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Remember - Code varies city to city, county to county, state to state, and year to year!
I pulled some Romex in flex once - and was amazed at how incredibly difficult it was.
...Retired IBEW electrician.
Steve Noll | The Used Equipment Dealer Directory: | http://www.big-list.com | Peltier Information Directory: | http://www.peltier-info.com
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 22:47:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Not since 1999., Romex is OK in multifamily above 3 floors now
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Thanks for the update... I wasn't aware of that. Glad to hear it, though... always thought it was a pretty silly rule.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 22:47:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

While I see this as a very likely possibility, the law itself is really stupid when you think about it. If it's inside greenfield or steel conduit, it's in accordance with the code. Whether you use single wire or romex, the wire is the same thing. Actually, the romex has more insulation around the wires, so you'd think it would be better insulated (although not necessary). It's things like this that often make me wonder who writes these codes....
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

Since the concern with Romex is fire propagation and smoke contribution the presence of the jacket and kraft paper fillers is definitely a real problem in high rise buildings whether the cable is sleeved or not. The smoke contributed by ordinary plastic sheathed cables during a fire is phenomenal and that smoke is particularly toxic as burning plastic produces large amounts of cyanide and other noxious fumes.
So in answer to your question "who writes these codes" it is guys and galls like me who have had the pleasure of crawling down smoke choked hallways on floors well out of reach of the tallest aerial ladder made searching for other peoples relatives at 0dark30.
No one can fully understand all of the thought that goes into public safety codes because they cover so much ground and like everything else in public life are the result of a political process that involves competing interest and compromise. I do wish that people would not assume that the purpose of all public safety codes was to rip the off and line someone elses pocket with their money.
--
Tom Horne, Firefighter/EMT

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