Romex bend radius: How tight can I make it?

I have 6-3 Romex that I'm running to an attached garage subpanel. It will have to run through a wall, then bend 90 degrees and run along that wall exposed for about 2 feet horizontally about 9 inches off the floor. I intend to run it through EMT for protection for that distance, but I'd like to run it flat against the wall, or as close as possible.
It appears that the tightest bend radius I can use on 6-3 Romex would be about six inches--which would put the conduit six inches out from the wall. Is that the case? How can I get it to hug the wall?
--
RDKirk

"Men occasionally stumble on the truth, but most of them pick themselves
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RDKirk wrote:

The tightest permissible bend is a radius equal to five times the diameter of the cable. If you are changing over to conduit then consider bringing the cable into a box and running the conduit from the box. Better protection and a neater looking installation should result. -- Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just to add to Tom's response. The EMT (Or any other metal conduit) must be grounded. That can be achieved by following Tom's advice and ground the box. You should get at least a 6'' x 6'' x 4'' box though I think 8'' x 8'' x 4'' will be more comfortable to bend wires in. Also, you must strip off the outer jacket of the romex before sleeving it into the conduit.
If you are running this in a garage only 9" off of the floor I strongly suggest that you use rigid conduit instead of EMT. The EMT will ding and crimp if hit by lawnmowers and cars etc.
I usually keep any wiring installation in garages up at least 4' or more to prevent damage and because gasoline fumes lay low to the ground. An electrical spark and gasoline fumes don't go well together. That may be a code requirement, but I would have to look it up to be sure.
If you are using this wire to feed the subpanel you must have 4 conductors. 2 hots, 1 neutral (Grounded conductor), and 1 ground (Grounding conductor). In a subpanel the neutral and ground must be kept separate.
Be safe.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com says...

I hadn't intended to "change over" to conduit, because there would be only two feet of unprotected length before it re-entered a wall. The subpanel will be mounted flush with the drywall. But it appears that may be my only course.
--
RDKirk

"Men occasionally stumble on the truth, but most of them pick themselves
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

If you are using a flush panel it would be just as easy to use romex and cut open the drywall to run the cable through drilled holes in the studs and then replace the drywall.
Tom J
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
@att.net says...

In this case, the garage was attached some time after the house was built. The original brick wall of the house is still in place, so the cable will have to go through the brick wall, then horizontally along the brick for two feet before it meets the drywall of the garage.
--
RDKirk

"Men occasionally stumble on the truth, but most of them pick themselves
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go to an electrical syupply or hardware store and buy an LB (it's a special elbow with a cover on it). Then strip the outerjacket off the cable and you can make a sharp bend inside the LB. You can buy them in pvc or steel, match the kind of pipe you are using, and if using steel pipe, be sure the pipe and LB are grounded.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

that
floor.
I'd
be
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.