Ridge Vents Vs. Turbines- Help!

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I need an answer fairly quickly on this: I am having a new roof put on my house in NW Fla., thanks to Hurricane Ivan. The crew boss suggested I have them install 2 turbines on the roof instead of putting the ridge vents back on. Crew boss is from Texas and says nobody has ridge vents there, they use turbines instead. Is this a good idea, or should I stick with the ridge vents? What about having both? Seems if one type of ventilation is good, two types would be better, ie, should I have the ridge vents put back on AND have them install the turbines? Thanks for any advice you can offer!
Dan
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I need an answer fairly quickly on this: I am having a new roof put on my house in NW Fla., thanks to Hurricane Ivan. The crew boss suggested I have them install 2 turbines on the roof instead of putting the ridge vents back on. Crew boss is from Texas and says nobody has ridge vents there, they use turbines instead. Is this a good idea, or should I stick with the ridge vents? What about having both? Seems if one type of ventilation is good, two types would be better, ie, should I have the ridge vents put back on AND have them install the turbines? Thanks for any advice you can offer!
Dan
Ain't that America... something to see!
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Dan wrote:>I need an answer fairly quickly on this: I am having a new roof put on my

turbines need a little maintenance now and then. Tom Work at your leisure!
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I agree keep the ridge vent, just what you need is an object on your roof that is an target for the wind. Here in AZ we use both vents. But we do not have hurricanes nor does most of Texas. I have had turbines and they work provided that they are big enough and there are enough of them. They sweak when they get old, 3-5 years depending on the type of bearing. An ridge vent is silent and looks a whole lot better.
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scribbled this interesting note:

Only the cheap turbines give problems. The ones we install have a lifetime warranty from the manufacturer and come with sealed bearings, not open bushings that need to be greased on occasion.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Yes! My neighbors turbines have been up there since he re-roofed, twenty years ago, they spin in the slightest breeze. I have turbines on my home to, bought a cheap pair first, replaced them right away with a high quality pair. Turbins work better in an area with some constant breeze. If you are in an area with little wind ridge vents will be good enough. If there is a fairly constant breeze in your area then turbines will probaly be better at moving air. Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comEDY (Tom) wrote in message

I think ridge venting is the most effective venting. It doesn't need a breeze and gives a uniform and consistent outlet along the entire roof at the highest point. Combined with proper soffit venting, it's the way to go.
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Dan wrote:

included with any new installation.
Regardless of your choice, make sure that ANY vent product you install has Florida Product Approval. Several of my neighbors here on Florida's west coast were surprised when their ceilings were ruined due to wind-driven rain that came in through their roof vents. Turns out that their roof vents weren't on the approved list and didn't meet state standards for water intrusion.
If your crew boss doesn't know what the Product Approval law is, you are in big trouble. How will you know that the other elements of your roof (such as the underlayment system) are product approved? Much of the damage to roofing statewide was to roof systems that didn't meet requirements.
http://www.dca.state.fl.us/fhcd/fbc/committees/product_approval/PA_QA2_082203.pdf http://www.floridabuilding.org/pr/pr_srch.asp
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Ridge vents will save you substantial money on your cooling costs. They are also maintenance free. I live in Texas and all the smart roofers and homeowners install ridge vents. Some also install powered roof vents for the times when the ridge vents can't keep up.
Your contractor is not very smart.
Pj
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Power fan vents may not be that smart either. They may suck the conditioned air into the attic from the finished house.
wrote:

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wrote:

Ridge vents or turbines is more of a regional debate as far as I am concerned! Just because someone recommends on over the other has nothing to do with his inteligence! In our area the majority of the homes have turbines. Greg
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wrote:

Research my man, research. Google 'ridge vents'.
It is a bit harder to install ridge vents but the extra effort will pay for the trouble in short order.
The contractor is a real dumb ass that likely just doesn't have the experience so he makes up lies to convince the home owner about how great turbines are. And this is not regional, it applies from Maine to Alaska to Florida.

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We must have a bunch of stupid contractors in out area then! The majority of the homes around have turbines, a few have gone cheap with the crappy plastic square vents, and very few have ridge vents. Greg
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My vote is for the ridge vents. If you want and don't mind the appearance and maintenance issues, add a turbine. Here in E.TN all the new homes have ridge vents--turbines are a thing of the past.

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FWIW, Here in SW Florida nobody uses turbine vents. On the other hand, ridge vents are also problematic in that they can leak fairly easily. There are ridge vents rated for wind/rain in Florida, or other static roof vents can be an option. Gable vents are the most practical, but not possible on many roofs.
There is also some concern about venting roofs at all in warm, humid climates such as ours (not necessarily yours). Turbine vents also provide less square footage than ridge vents, meaning you need more of them (One for every 8 feet of ridge vent is the number I remember).
Jeff
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scribbled this interesting note:

Here's a good site that pretty well describes air flow through an attic as well as how the various ways to vent an attic work.
The design and lay out of your house, the pitch of your roof, the volume of your attic, the amount of insulation you have, the relative humidity of your climate, and more all go into deciding what system of vents you need. Indeed, just soffit vents, with no additional vents of any kind, do a pretty good job if your climate is usually a bit windy.
Only soffit vents, gable vents, power vents, turbine vents, ridge vents, they all have pros and cons and what it comes down to is what you want and what you are most comfortable with. Some people have a rabid fear of power vents, others think the only way to vent a house is with ridge vents, sometimes just soffit vents are the only choice, others are delighted with a couple of turbine vents. I've used all of these. They all are good choices if designed, installed, maintained, and used properly.
You ask good questions. The foreman on the job may very well be correct. Then again he may not. Every response you've had to your question is merely an opinion and only you can make the best decision. After all it is your house and you are the one ultimately responsible for the decisions made........ -- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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On Fri, 12 Nov 2004 10:40:59 -0600, John Willis

Forgot the link, Try this:
http://www.factsfacts.com/MyHomeRepair/ventilation.htm
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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scribbled this interesting note:

You'll find that in this forum ridge vents with more soffit vents is the preferred answer.
I happen to not prefer ridge vents, and will eventually take them off our house (they were there when we bought this house and are currently falling apart and need removed and replaced with regular ridge shingles.)
It is hard to make a guess as to what would work best on your house without more information. Size, type of construction, attic volume, existing ventilation, etc.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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<< Is this a good idea, or should I stick with the ridge vents? >>
Turbines are a "feel good" solution to venting. It takes energy to turn the vanes, And the energy comes from air flow through the vanes. Since the air flow is reduced to turn the vanes, why not just have an unobstrructed flow? Seems to me this is another case of ignoring common sense and the laws of physics. Ergo: turbines are useful only to keep out rodents, birds, or whatever. HTH
Joe
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When they cut the hole in the roof for our turbine the outrush of HOT air was obvious from the ground. The HOT air rising is the driving function for the turbine not the tangential breeze.
On 11 Nov 2004 16:49:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comtosspam (Joe Bobst) wrote:

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