Riddle me this hangers of doors

This doesn't compute.
I'm trying to put a door sweep on my door that goes to the garage and the crack between it and the floor is not uniform. It appears when the the door is closed that the gap is about 1/2" by the hinges and about 1/4" by the door knob. So I toss a level on the floor and see that it is indeed level. So I put a level on the top of the door, and it is level. If the door, the floor are both level then why is the crack wider on one end?
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Eigenvector wrote:

The gap is at the bottom of the door. Why did you put a level on the head of the door?
It's possible that the door was trimmed at some point due to seasonal binding or whatever. If the floor covering is newer than the door, maybe they leveled the floor at that time.
R
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No, the door is new and was not trimmed. The floor was not modified so far as I can tell at least.
I can see the door being out of true, but if the floor under the door is level and the door itself is level (at least at the top), why wouldn't the crack under the door be even? I can't see how level the door is on the bottom, there simply isn't sufficient space for something like that.
It's not like I'm killing myself here, but something doesn't add up. If the frame is out of true, entirely possible, it still wouldn't matter, the door is still level - at least on three sides.
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On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 13:03:08 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Check square at the bottom. Trimmed or not it might be not be square

Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Oren wrote:

here. using a level, you can check everything--head jamb, side jambs, thresholds, door slab itself and judge for yourself.

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So what is the riddle?
(I'm not the judge) -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Eigenvector wrote:

No, just one according to you.
Try measuring the door...height at both sides, width at top and bottom.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Closely equals Square.... -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Oren,
I re-read your post. Are you asking how there can be a discrepancy when you read "level" both top and bottom?
A spirit level is not a very accurate instrument and is very subject to the person reading it. Nothing irritates me more than to have someone report that "its between the lines". When you spend the money for a better level like Crick or Stabila, you are still subject to operator error. The old Dumpy builder's level had huge long vials on them that really showed minute changes. It is important when using your level in reference to your door that you keep the level turned the same direction at both top and bottom. Your door is probably 3' wide. What size level did you use? A 9" torpedo level would be grossly inadequate for the job. A good 4' level would be fairly accurate, but will require quite an accurate eye to detect an 1/8" variation. A good level and a good carpenter should be able to do it well. YMMV. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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I was kinda wondering if the bubble moves at all :-)
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I commented on the thread. It wasn't my door. I suggested the door might not be square at the bottom...thus the gap the OP experienced.
He seems to have drawn the conclusion in a more recent thread. -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 11:26:33 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Does this door have an adjustable threshold? -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Why does it matter? Very few floors are level. Very few walls and jambs are plumb. This is true whether they are framed or concrete. Most door cuts (to adjust for heavier carpet, etc. are made parallel to the door in its closed position with no thought as to level. I hope your floor is straight enough for your weatherstrip to seal all the way across. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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The bottom of the door is not necessary level just because the top is, i.e., the bottom of the door is not parrallel to the top.
If the floor in the vicinity of the door is truly level, and the bottom of the door is truly level in the closed position, but the gap changes as the door swings, then the door is not plumb.
At any rate, there are floor sweeps that will accomodate a 1/4" difference without trouble.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.
Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Thanks all for the replies. It wasn't intended to be an exercise in how to use a level. I was just interested in why if two measurements were reading level the gap would be changing. I think the most obvious reason is because the door is not perfectly square.
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detect the difference in level. If you turned the level end-for-end the level itself may be inaccurate.
Don Young
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Eigenvector spake thus:

Well, looks like the *top* of the door is level but not the *bottom*. Was the door trimmed at the bottom?
--
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