reverse osmosis water filter

I just bought a reverse osmosis water filter system off of ebay.
I currently have a whole house water filter with a couple of filters, one charcoal and one not, but I don't always like the taste.
I don't know what reverse osmosis is, but will it be better than the filters?
PJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Reverse osmosis waist a gallon for every gallon filtered. They filter out most everything, it should taste better
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just moved into a house and hope you don't mind a question.
We have well water with a salt style water softener. As far as I know, that does nothing to remove or kill bacteria. Does the reverse osmosis system remove bacteria as well as iron, etc.?
Is the reverse osmosis system something that would take the place of the saline water softener or would it be used in addition to it?
I had the water tested for bacteria and it came back negative. I am just being paranoid!
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Reverse osmosis (which may require pre-sediment filters and a water softener on certain well water to prevent plugging the filter membrane) removes plenty of irons, etc but not all of the bacteria. Bacteria can grow on the output side of the filter membrane. What you need is the UV ( ultraviolet) lamp sterilizers hooked up after the osmosis filter or your normal filter. But as the lamp ages, bacteria will hide behind particles and escape sterilization. If the water is tested for bacteria and it came back negative then I won't worry. Think of it as part of building immunity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They filter out most everything compared to your other filters but will eventually absorb calcium or minerals from your body if taken internaly. This is okay for short term but this may lead to other unforseen disease.
I have seen good results with a water ionizer for my elderly parents. They say it taste better. They can now get up without assistance and walk, which they have difficulties before. I'm still skeptical of water ionizer but not as much as before. I only use reverse osmosis or distilled water for other applications: health detox, automotive, plants, or processing food.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

R/O actually wastes about 4 gallons for every gallon it produces. It removes substances at the ionic level. It has a 90 to 95% filtration efficiency depending on the filter and the source water. Using a water softener will actually help with the efficiency as an r/o unit has an easier time (no scale buildup for example) filtering sodium rather than calcium.
If the source water has harmful bacteria in it 5 to 10% get through and they can replicate after the filter.
You do NOT get a significant amount of calcium and minerals from your tap water in the first place and drinking r/o or distilled water will not harm you from mineral loss.
Ionization still strips the minerals from the water but doesn't clean the water at the level of r/o. Ionization resin beds can only be recharged with some rather harsh chemicals. No water waste.
Distilled requires energy to vaporize the water. Some contaminates will pass in distillation but can be removed with carbon filtration. Minor water waste depending on the condenser.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

True about calcium, but I don't think this is true about minerals. Drinking water is often the only way to get some imiportant trace minerals.
I, like several others, have lived on a sailboat for many years where the only source of water was oobtained by confervting sea water into fresh water via R/O. First of all, the water TASTES GREAT, but alas is LESS FILLING in some important minerals. My wife, and several other women, experience problems due to the lack of iron in the water.
It's necessary to take vitamin supplements if R/O water is your only source of water.
I think the ratio of water taken into the R/O system, to good water taken out of it, is a function of the salinity of the water. When converting pure sea water, like we were, the ratio was 10 gallons in to 1 gallon out.
In answer to the poster's original question - will R/O be better. Absolutely! R/O will "clean up" your water much, much better than filters. I believe it will also remove some "good stuff" (trace elements) and some "bad stuff" will pass.
Using R/O to purify water that doesn't have a salinity problem seems like using a sledge hammer on a tack. I would hope there is a better "solution" but then, I don't know the extent of your water problems. You are right to be concerned about the quality of your water. For sure, the people who don't drink it (county officials and builders) won't be all that concerned.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 09:32:48 -0800, "Bob Richardson" <bobr at whidbey dot com> wrote:

Thanks. Good Info.
I'd think that you would have a system for catching rainwater, much like my kin do in thier cistern in West Texas.
I suspect your system costs a great deal more than the one I bought.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itemC42802693&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT
PJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Let me ask something.
They sent only enough resin to fill 3/4 of the cannister it goes in. That doesn't look right to me. The water is going thru the cannister and I had assumed that the cannister would be full of resin.
Is the water being adequately treated by a 3/4 full cannister or should I ask for more resin?
PJ
On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 09:32:48 -0800, "Bob Richardson" <bobr at whidbey dot com> wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

d/i water is far purer than r/o water. furthermore, it's pretty easy to recharge the d/i bed.
http://archimedes.galilei.com/raiar/ditwp.html

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 11:18:05 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

I didn't say it was difficult. I said it was recharged with some rather harsh chemicals. I agree in that D/I removes ionic contaminates that make water hard better than r/o, but I said it doesn't "clean" the water at the level of r/o. Salt water softeners work by ionic exchange, d/i works by ionic absorption. R/O on the other hand "rejects" 90-95% of nearly everything (not just ions) at the ionic level.
Quote from your link there. This does sound like "harsh chemicals" ............................................................................... IMPORTANT - IMPORTANT - IMPORTANT
DANGER - POISON
THE ACTIVE INGREDIENTS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE HARMFUL. BOTH CHEMICALS CAUSES SEVERE BURNS TO EYES AND SKIN ON CONTACT. VAPOR HARMFUL MAY BE FATAL IF SWALLOWED. MAY CAUSE BLINDNESS IF SPLASHED IN EYES. USE ONLY WITH ADEQUATE VENTILATION.
KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
Read Carefully All Other Warnings and Directions on Each Label.
USE ONLY AS DIRECTED
The Seller warrants these products for their intended use only. Any misapplication or negligent use of these products will void any and all warranties-whether implied or expressed. These products could become corrosive in nature as well as harmful to other items besides those designated in relation to the proper application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PJx wrote:

Must've been dozing off in chemistry class, LOL.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Status
Installed and working. But now without incidents.
PJ
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.