reusing PEX fittings


What's the consensus here - should the PEX fittings be reused if the line has to be cut and reworked? I cut some old PEX lines that I installed about a year ago and I noticed that there was some blackish residue on the fitting - rust from the galvanized to PEX interface most likely. But I notice the discoloration and the fact that the crimp ring to some extent distorts the fitting and it makes me wonder if I should discard old fittings.
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2007 12:48:17 -0800, "Eigenvector"

My instructions are vague about re-using a fitting. It simply says ..if you make a bad crimp - cut it out and replace it....
No mention of distortion in the fitting. -- Oren
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison
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wrote:

Well by definition it is a compression fitting - some distortion is required. Doesn't mean it's automatically bad of course.
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On Fri, 2 Mar 2007 14:40:14 -0800, "Eigenvector"

I would not be scared to cut the crimp off the fitting with a Dremel tool and use the fitting again. Using the GO-NO GO gauge, the crimp can best determine the proper crimp.
I'm sure many fittings have been used a second time.
-- Oren
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison
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wrote:

I think you mean using a dremel to cut off the ring and use the fitting again. This also assumes that the fitting (nipple) has not been deformed. Unless the fitting is deformed or corroded it is fine to reuse the fitting.
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How much money are you talking about? How much is "peace of mind" worth to you? I'd go with new
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Well my piece of mind is worth more than 2 bucks for an elbow fitting. I have a big bag of them, PEX is usually sold in contractor packs, so I use new anyway. But I was wondering about this as I tossed the old ones back into the toolbox.
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Are we talking about brass or plastic fittings?
cheers Bob
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Brass
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EV-
Since they are brass & there are crimp cutters available l would get that they are reusable
However, like Ed said "piece of mind"
Since you're doing th soldering experiment you could also do a re-use experiment.
cheers Bob
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The crimp cutters work well. I doubt the fitting are distorted that much during the crimp process.
It looks to me like the pipe is distorted when the crimp ring is crimped. From the fittings I've un-ringged, I couldn't tell the new fittings from the old, brass was in great shape.
For the procedure, I would recommend cutting through on side first, rotating the fitting 180 degrees and start the cut on that side. The ring will bend back on itself.
Of things I wouldn't try is the Dremel, you don't want to nick the fitting accidently.
Good luck,
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I just learned about "crimp cutters" here.
I Dremel a diagonal across the side of the crimp and peel it away. At most I nick/cut the PEX, not the brass. Using the tools I have at hand. I will look into the crimp cutters.
-- Oren
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. Thomas A. Edison
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wrote:

The crimp cutters work about 75% of the time. I actually like the idea of using my Dremel, but having the cutters in my back pocket is much much more convienent. The location of the crimp on the fitting affects how well the cutters work, too far away from the end and the cutters can't generate enough force to break the copper.
But even if the cutters don't work the first time, you can usually chew through the crimp ring using the cutters by attacking the ring from multiple locations - it will oil can break eventually.
Actually the hardest part of recovering the fitting is getting that stupid nub of PEX off the fitting that's left over from the cut.
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I don't recall the brand of crimp ring cutter I have at the moment, but I've not had one fail yet. I'll see if I can get a brand a post it in a day or so. Agree with the little nub'n left over...but it beats throwing the fitting away.
DAC
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One of the reasons I brought it up was because of the whole flap with PB and the problems that originated from the installation. It was my understanding that improper installation at the fittings was the real cause of all the failures PB had.
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As I understand it, it was choice of fittings too. Some PB used metal fittings and crimp rings, while some was installed with plastic fittings. The plastic fittings broke down over time and developed leaks, while the metal ones were apparently better. Of course, using unskilled labour to install the pipe could have resulted in some bad crimp connections too.
Our house has a PB main water feed, which used to be connected to the copper in-house plumbing using a plastic compression fitting. Our house inspector recommended replacing it. So we had a plumber do that while he was here doing some other work. He removed the plastic coupling and installed a PEX to MPT crimp coupling, a few inches of PEX, and then a PEX to PB crimp adapter.
We also have a couple of runs of PB inside the house, feeding the two outdoor taps. These are all copper crimp fittings, and seem to be OK so far.
    Dave
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