reusing flex gas hose for new stove

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Last night I was installing a new gas stove and I also had purchased a new flex gas line. But when I tried to hook it up, the stove had a 1/2 inch female thread, and the gas line I purchased was 3/4. I did not have any fittings, so I reused the flex line that was on the old stove, which was still in good shape.I had to remove the old fitting from the old stove. I checked for leaks, and they were none. Any issues with re-using a flex line?
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Yes, if you re-use the old line the appliance store won't get to make an obscene profit on a flex line you didn't need.
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Mikepier wrote:

Was the original a self cleaning oven? The extra heat of a self cleaning oven as well as certain cleaning agents that may be used in a kitchen can deteriorate the materials in a flex pipe. I would not re-use one. Get what you need from the hardware store, not the appliance store that is likely to charge double for a cheap one.
I don't really like flex for ovens of any kind. Many of the ovens I have seen specifically specify no flex pipe.
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.

Then how are you suppose to hook up the gas? You can't pipe it directly beacuse there is no room to get to the back of the stove. I thought every household uses flex for stove.
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This entire reply is ridiculous. There's no heat down where the gas line enters the stove, and how would the cleaning products in the kitchen get on the flex pipe??!? Anyway, there's no way to hookup a hard piped stove because you wouldn't be able to get behind it. Flex is always on a stove. No stove would specify "no flex" because it is impossible to install any other way. As far as re-using them, why not? That's what they're for, flexing.
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How were stoves and other appliances hooked up to the gas piping before the flex pipe was invented and approved for use? It hasn't been around forever, as it is a relatively recent product.

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On Tue, 27 Feb 2007 10:39:09 -0500, "EXT"

I would suppose the pipe entered from the side, and if people had to look at 6 inches of pipe, that was the price they paid for living in America.
(or wherever)

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EXT wrote:

They were made of rubber, with push-on fittings.
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They've been in use longer than self-cleaning ovens I would guess!
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soft copper.
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Don't be silly, it is not impossible. Read page 11 http://www.kitchenaid.com/assets/pdfs/product/ZINSTALL/9763460.pdf
OTOH, in Massachusetts, it must be on a 36" flex line.
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Ok, so nothing's impossible. But that'd be a waste of time and resources to hard plumb a stove.
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Yes, as I stated in a previous reply, I admit NOTHING is impossible if you have time, money and resources. BUT why would you waste all these things to hard pipe a stove? What a pain if you drop something behind it. Mine, I just tip it forward and reach behind. You have to head to the tool shed and gas valve. I'll stick with the flex and I'll re-use it. I'm not paranoid and don't let my shadow scare me into not leaving the house.
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wrote:

I wouldnt reuse a old one. The past versions had quality issues, and if you reuse it and it causes a fire insurance may disown you leaving ou with no insurance and a burned out home.
Geez why risk it for 30 bucks:(
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Steve Barker wrote:

I did it because the installation instructions with the stove specifically indicated doing so and warned about using flex pipe. The next time I did it because I found it really was not much trouble and I felt it was more professional. Funny thing when the original oven was delivered the guys delivering tried everything they could to sell me the flex pipe as part of a package that I really had to have, until I showed them the manual that came with the stove. It would appear they got commission on the sale of the cheap kit (not cheap price, just cheap product.)
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Flex makes a lot of sense in a seismic zone. In many areas it's recommended (if not required) for water heaters. It's pretty sensible for ovens, cooktops and other applicances too.
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I always re-use the flex line if it doesn't leak. Having said that, if you read the warnings that came with that pipe it may tell you that it has to be replaced each time it is removed.
The reason is that there is a soft metal which is smashed slightly to conform to the male part. If that metal is tightened and then retightened it could cause it to fail. There may also be a gasket in there which can become deformed. Basically, it is designed to be used only once and that is the usual recommendation. Since your stove is a new one I think you should go ahead and buy a new pipe.
Make no mistake, flammable gas is potentially explosive and deadly. Recently we had a case here in MN where a house exploded with a guy inside. It took them several days to recover the parts of his body while his family waited.
The explosion lifted the roof completely off the house. The walls cave in. Then the roof falls back down on the rubble. You have almost no chance in a gas explosion so buy a new pipe.
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Lawrence wrote:

Then it was't natural gas. You need competent arson investigators in your local fire department.
Natural gas explosions blow out the walls from the bottom, then the roof falls straight down.
Dynamite, on the other hand, blows the roof off and expands the walls from the top
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It'll work okay, most of the time. But you are taking an avoidable risk. These things are designed for a one-time installation and re-use is specifically not recommended by the manufacturers of the flex hoses (surprise!) or many applicances. Re-use is very likely a code violation too.
In any event, you've solved part of the problem -- your leak test shows that you were able to get a seal. Now you just have the elevated risk of premature failure due to metal fatigue, corrosion or whatever. Assuming the old hose appears to be in good shape that risk is probably not too high but you can never be really sure, and that's the point.
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I would not reuse an old hose that was put in when the previous stove was installed. If it were a relatively new hose and you had to get behind your stove for something or were redoing your floor, etc. then I'd reuse it.
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