Retrofitting interior doors - pre-hung?


I'm going to replace all 6 of my interior doors. I've replaced a door once, and bought just a door (i.e. not pre-hung). It came out okay - but just okay. I'm thinking that to do 6 doors I'd be better off getting pre-hung. I'm not crazy about replacing casings for 6 doors, but I also think my chances of getting all 6 to fit and close properly aren't good. (I'm a decent carpenter but not a professional.) What's the collective wisdom on this?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Test group SBA wrote:

If you do not have the skill set, and the chisels and saws, for finish trim work, and this is a one-time project, prehung is definitely the way to go. Prehung also has the advantage that you can do most of the finishing out in the garage and not mess up the house, and only need to do a little putty stick and maybe a few tiny paint touchups, once they are installed. If you get split-jamb prehungs, finish them while pulled apart, lest you get a bare stripe after they are installed.
Take one door out, down to the rough opening (the studs and header), and measure size and wall thickness (assuming all 6 are the same size, of course.) That is what you will need to choose the new doors.
Start at the hinge side, get it vertical with shims, and pin it. Then using the closed door as a guide, shim and pin the latch side. Once you have a warm fuzzy that the door operates properly, install the rest of the fasteners, stopping frequently to make sure door still works smoothly. Be careful not to over-tighten any screws. Then install the remaining trim to cover the shims. By the 3rd door or so, you will have the hang of it. Hanging pre-hung doors is the first thing they stuck me on as a kid, once they took me off sweeping duty, because it is so easy.
--
aem sends...


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

I was much older when I did my first...three children, one of whom knocked the door down trying to get to a sibling. Just a normal squabble, but the door was not fastened in place other than by the finishing nails holding the trim in place!! There are many ways to learn how NOT to do things :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2010 3:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I hope that your front entry door was (is?) fastened more securely!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The garage entrance door to my previous house wasn't. It is now; 4" screws through the hinges and striker.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

I have seen that myself, even on an upper-end 'custom' house. My old man would have sent me home without my hammer if I ever tried that on a site he was responsible for. 12d or 16d finish nails through jamb and shims, into the stud, at at least 4 points on each side, BEFORE the casing was nailed down. Set the nails. Solid-core and exterior doors got screws, suitably hidden, and the strike plate and some of the hinge screws got replaced with longer ones, so all the load was not on the jamb.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Test group SBA wrote:

The casing is the easy part, jambs are harder.
It is easy to hang a "pre-hung" door improperly (just ask my ex-father-in-law). Things still have to be perpendicular/parallel etc., wedges still have to be used. And used *properly*.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you remove the casings, will you then have to redo the baseboards? Patch and paint the walls?
I replaced my interior doors (from hollow luan to solid pine). I used slabs as opposed to pre-hung. I think it is easier than pre-hung.
It is easy if you follow these steps to get consistent results:
Mount hinges to the door WITHOUT mortising them, and then hang the door to get the height adjustment.
Then scribe around the hinges with a knife, chisel them out, and re-hang the door with mortised hinges.
Then mark for fit along the edge. Invest the time to make a "saw board" and bevel the door edge at 5 degrees (see link below). You can also handplane with a bench plane.
Then and only then cut the door knob.
The worst mistake is to pencil around the hinges and bolt plate, and then cut with a chisel. Looks like crap. Mount the hardware, Scribe the line with a sharp Stanley knife, remove and chisel. This way there's no need for a special jig/router to get a nice cut.
You also may need to add a middle hinge if going from hollow to solid. Cut/chisel those into the jamb the same way.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/4283497
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 11:00:34 -0700 (PDT), Test group SBA

Never forget to pull the nail from the jamb that holds the door in place (LOL) for shipping. Some doors have a nylon bolt that is removed from the door knob opening after install. Those are easy and can be done after the door is installed. Forget that nail and you need to pull the jamb out for another try. Once that nail is pulled things can twist around, you can damage the jamb.
I prefer to have a helper on one side of the door and can tell me if the things are "looking good". The helper can shim and check level / square / plumb as you check the other side. Use long levels.
I've installed doors in a matter of minutes (hanging) and others that caused a fit to get right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guys this is all great advice. (I can't believe someone hung a door with only the trim nails! Yikes!) Yes, when I did my one and only door last year (my dog ate it!) I thought to hang it on the hinges first, to make sure I got the spacing right, but then I marked it with a pencil, routed most of it out, and finished with a chisel. But I like the idea of using the Stanley knife! I think after hearing all this I'll go with just doors, not pre-hung. For one thing, I'll save a couple of hundred bucks over getting pre-hung doors (and 12 pieces of casing). I can use the $$$. And depending on the weight of the doors I'll consider putting in a 3rd hinge - another good piece of advice that I wouldn't have thought of.
I don't hang out on this group much but whenever I do, I'm consistently impressed with the quality and quantity of advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 16:44:22 -0700 (PDT), Test group SBA

Nor, could I. But a good yank on the jamb(s) brought the frame down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can buy a drill bit, or just a hammer punch.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, I've hung cabinet doors etc. and I know exactly what you mean. I bought one quite a while ago and it's a must-have.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2010 11:00, Test group SBA wrote:

With moderate carpentry skill I successfully replaced 8 interior doors without replacing the casings. I did invest about $150 in a low end router and hinge mortising jig. Using the old door as a template, I mortised the hinges with no problem. The tough part was ripping the doors to the right width -- each one required about 1/4 inch removed. I used a circular saw and straightedge clamped to the door. After doing the first door each subsequent one took about two hours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I already have a router (a wireless Linksys) (yes that was a joke) and I have an electric plane that I've used exactly once in 2 years - when I installed the door my dog ate. (I'll put on a 5-degree bevel as was suggested earlier.) So I think I'm good to go tool-wise. Anyway, I don't buy tools so I can get projects done; I take on projects so I can buy tools.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.