Rethinking "Made in China"

Page 10 of 16  

wrote:

Nope. Gear reduction starters came on the scene in the late sixties - the "high park hummingbird"
You wanted something REALLY awfull sounding at startup, you wanted a 37 or 38 Terraplane.
Open bell housing, hunting gear set, and hydraulic lifters on a flathead six. The starter howled like a banshee - you could hear it a mile away on a cold still morning, and the lifters clattered for about 15 seconds on just about every start.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

The Mopar gear reduction starters drew a lot less current from the battery if I remember correctly. A low battery would start a Dart with a slant six but wouldn't start a Falcon with a six.
TDD
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wrote:

Their style has varied so much, and so often, that it's pretty hard to say you don't like their style as a reason to have never owned one and to say you never will.
I'll own another Chrysler long before I'll own another GM!!!!!
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Varied does not mean pleasing to my eyes in any variation. The Stratus was not so bad and I even drove a rental on a trip, but I never cared for anything else and did not like the Stratus enough to by one. Never cared for the Dodge Charger that so many guys fawned over. The group they have now is just plain ugly, IMO. Obviously, others like them or they never would have made it out of the factory.
I like GM style, but that is about all they offer these days. I have a deteriorating Buick in my driveway that I liked for the first 30,000 miles, but things started going wrong. Best quality and most trouble free car I've ever owned was my '07 Hyundai Sonata with 67,000 trouble free miles. Only maintenance was 2 tires and oil changes. I just bought a '10 last week. It will the last of the V-6 on Sonata.
Cheapest car I've ever bought was a '64 Karman Ghia convertible in 1975. Paid $15 for it. Worth every penny too.
Best resale value was a '64 Pontiac Tempest. Paid $100 for it, drove it for a year, sold it back to the original owner for $100.
Most fun car was a '62 Corvair
Most expensive to both buy and maintain was '83 a Mercedes 300D
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We've seen most every brand represented but American Motors. In '73 I bought a '60 Rambler American 2-dr with a brand new rebuilt flathead straight six (1-barrel!) for $25. It was one of the most enjoyable cars I've ever owned. Drove it for 5 yrs without a single problem. Cruised effortlessly at 75mph and got 23mpg. When I bought it, it had no driver's side window, yet the snowy OR Winters were no match for the heater which would keep the interior at bread baking temps at 65mph in 20 deg F weather. It was 2 yrs before I got around to replacing the window. If I could find a '60 station wagon version in good shape, I'd buy it in a heartbeat. ;)
http://jalopnik.com/5288930/1960-rambler-american-custom
nb
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notbob wrote:

I think my dad had one of those for a while and when I was in college, he got a Rambler wagon. It was an interesting car, the vacuum advance rotated the whole distributer on the six cylinder engine and the doors had double seals which made for a remarkable lack of wind noise while zipping down the highway at 70mph.
TDD
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Talking AMC - Our family has had a few.
Dad bought a 61 American (ex Bell Canada) to use as a truck, then gave it to my brother to drive. When he was finished with it, it became a truck again, untill it was no longer fit for the road and my younger brother used it as a "field car" for a couple years. He tried hard to kill it, but couldn't. Dad also had a 64 Classic that was used as a truck - and he gave it to one of his men to drive because it was better than the heap he was hauling his family around in. Dad also bought a brand new 1968 Rebel wagon. I had a '65 classic that I bought for $65, drove for 6 months, and sold for $300 when I left to go to Aftica in 1973. Then I had a 1975 Pacer for a few years, and a 1972 Ambassagor SST 9 passenger wagon. Then there was the "pre-AMC" 1937 or 1938 Terraplane.
They were ALL good cars (with the exception of the "terrible pain")
I always liked the styling of the late '50s Ramblers.
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wrote:

Boy, you got a GOOD one!!

That's not hard. One good laugh is worth $15 today!!!!

If you need to ask "how much" you know you can't afford it, The purchace price of a Mercedes is just the "entry fee"

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When I bought it, the car did not run. We did get it going, but soon after spent another $55 on rings and bearings, then it ran really well.
There was no heat because the ducting for heated air rusted out. I was caught in a torrential rain on the PA Turnpike one day. Drove for some miles and when I hit the brakes, it was like a tidal wave as the accumulated water in the back floor rushed forward over my feet. The back plastic window was pop riveted in place and fogged so that you could not see through it.
With the help of my brother, we converted it to 12 volt. He took a GM Delco alternator and had the shaft bored and threaded to go over the existing shaft of the VW generator pulley in place of the nut. A bracket was fabricated to keep the alternator body from spinning. All the bulbs wee changed and a rheostat controlled the wiper motor. The starter, OTOH, really cranked on 12V.
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wrote:

I loved the practicality of their minivans and the styling of the original Intrepid class. All were junk. Never again. We both drive Fords now (Mercury Sable and a Ranger) and I've been told our next car is going to be a Mustang convertible, so...
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On Dec 17, 10:23pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I remember when I was a real little kid my dad had an old beater Valiant - I think it was a '64 or thereabouts. He was always having problems with the carburetor on it... years later I dated a girl with a '69, that car had a Holley 1bbl and it too had issues. Replaced the carb with a Carter and it ran splendiferously ever after. Only problems with it after that point were a ballast resistor that failed, and the fact that the points would burn just about every 9 mos. like clockwork (maybe due to a off spec replacement ballast?) then she had to have the head redone because she didn't adjust the valves (probably ever) and burned one. Other than that it was a very reliable car, wish I had it today.
nate
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On 12/18/2009 8:34 AM, N8N wrote:

I had two slant sixes. One in a 1962 Plymouth and the other in the most terrible car ever built a 1976 Aspen. (I only got 200k trouble free miles on the engine, and there a few rattles as it approached the 200k mark)
I had trouble with the carburetor on the Aspen. When I made a left turn the car would die out for a second and then continue normally. After messing around with it for about a year an old mechanic told me the float was saturated with gas and replaced it. Never had a problem after that
Question: Will your Craftsman table saw handle the rpm produced by the slant 6? :->
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On 12/18/2009 8:34 AM, N8N wrote:
I had two slant sixes. One in a 1962 Plymouth and the other in the most terrible car ever built a 1976 Aspen. (I only got 200k trouble free miles on the engine, and there a few rattles as it approached the 200k mark)
CY: What was wrong with the Aspen? Mine was a 1974 Dodge Dart Swinger. Got 10.5 MPG, wouldn't run when it was wet.
I had trouble with the carburetor on the Aspen. When I made a left turn the car would die out for a second and then continue normally. After messing around with it for about a year an old mechanic told me the float was saturated with gas and replaced it. Never had a problem after that
CY: That mechanic was worth his weight in gold.
Question: Will your Craftsman table saw handle the rpm produced by the slant 6? :->
CY: Adjustable throttle, silly. Just don't rev it wide open like a teenager.
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On 12/18/2009 9:35 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Let me know how it works on your saw.
I had a 3 speed standard transmission on my slant six Aspen an got about 19 to 20 miles per gallon. About the same as today's cars of the same weight and size.
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I owned a '76 aspen as well, drive train was beyond complaint, but the rest of the car disintegrated to nothing. Engine held up to about 280,000 miles but I will admit to running bar and chain oil in it for the last 6 months of its life.
basilisk
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To reduce leaks?
My green Dodge van, had a leak at the rear crank shaft. I ran exclusively used motor oil for the last year or so. Amazing ammounts of oil.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Interesting idea. I've used heavier oils, or STP oil treatment.
--
Christopher A. Young
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The old-timer's trick was to change to paraffin-based oil. It would slow the leak and any smoking way down. This was always a last ditch solution to an old tired engine needing rebuild cuz it would sludge up an engine beyond belief and could never return to reg oils. I doubt you can even find/buy paraffin-based oil, anymore.
nb
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notbob wrote:

There is a common misconception about Paraffin-based oils and sludge formation. Many crude oil based engine oils have Paraffin in them and those oils do not cause sludge buildup in engines according to some experts, others have a different opinion. I remember the oil advertising for Pennsylvania grade crude oil which is high in paraffin.
Pro: http://www.yotarepair.com/sludge%20article.html
Con: http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html
TDD
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