Rethinking "Made in China"

Page 11 of 16  


Quaker state and Pennzoil are still made from parrafin base stock I believe. Perhaps not exclusively, but Pensylvania crude is parrafin.
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I remember when I was a real little kid my dad had an old beater Valiant - I think it was a '64 or thereabouts. He was always having problems with the carburetor on it... years later I dated a girl with a '69, that car had a Holley 1bbl and it too had issues. Replaced the carb with a Carter and it ran splendiferously ever after.
CY: Those carbs were interesting, you could actually adjust them. I found the adjustment that worked for me was lightly closed, and then out 3 half turns. The vacuum lines always wanted to fall off. If the vac line fell off (the one to the air cleaner) the car ran poorly.
Only problems with it after that point were a ballast resistor that failed,
CY: And the engine didn't run. I learned to carry spare ballast resistors. As also did most Chrysler owners.
and the fact that the points would burn just about every 9 mos. like clockwork (maybe due to a off spec replacement ballast?)
CY: Burning points is typically due to bad condensor. They are replaced as a set.
then she had to have the head redone because she didn't adjust the valves (probably ever) and burned one.
CY: Most likely, never. Few people do.
Other than that it was a very reliable car, wish I had it today.
CY: A starter and alternator every year and a half?
nate
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 09:32:50 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The ones that burned ballast resistors were the early electronics - dual ballast units.

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On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 18:15:21 -0800, LDosser wrote:

I believe they fitted aircon to at least some of the lines recently - I'm yet to go back over and try it out. I used to go into London a few nights a week and the trains were always hell in the summer months, with almost no air circulation... (and they used to bump around and feel like they were coming off the tracks, and the lights would sometimes all go out for several seconds at a time... ahh, memories :-)
cheers
Jules
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Ha, I'd forgotten about the lights! And the hellishly long stops with absolutely No air circulation? Usually right under the river. This in the days when the definition of Daring was taking off your shoes and socks and rolling up your trouser legs while having a day at the shore. NTM three blokes in suits, ties, knitted cardigans, and tweed caps filling potholes or digging ditches!
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Depends on the vehicle. I had a 318 in a 74 van. When the weather became very hot (100+), specially after they took the lead out of gas, it would ping badly going up a grade. I timed it by removing the engine shroud, loosening the distibutor clamp nut, and adjusting the distributor until the pinging ceased. All this while driving up said grade, the distributor being a within easy reach of my right hand.

I had this happen once. I removed the distibutor cap and saw it was literally dripping moisture. I liberally sprayed it and the points with WD40 and reassembled. Fired right up. The WD stands for water displacement.
nb
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notbob wrote:

The secret was to carry an extra "dual ballast resistor" in the glove box for all the Mopars with the electronic ignition. I had several go out and it was a 10 minute or less repair job.
TDD
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"The Daring Dufas" wrote:

The real secret is not to get involved with a Chrysler POS.
Lew
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 11:51:18 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

Some of the best cars I ever owned were early Mopars. I've owned 53, 57, 63, 69, 74, 76, 85, 88, and now a 2002.
The 69 was likely the best.
The 63 was a 170 slant six automatic Valiant done to the nines - went like stink, idled poorly, and liked it's gas. The 69 was a 225 automatic, not as highly tuned. Not as fast, and not as thirsty.
The '74 was also a 225 automatic, basically stock - a 25mpg highway car.
The 76 was a 318 Ramcharger - need I say more?? The 85 was a 2.6 Mitsu that I rebuilt - engine was still running 8 years later (in another car).
The 88 was a 3.0 Mitsu - it had 3 sets of heads over it's 240,000km lifespan before I sold it - still running and looking fantastic at 18 years of age.
The 2002 is a PT Cruiser.
The 57 was a 261 Flathead 6 in a Fargo Pickup. The 53 was a 241 Red Ram Hemi in a Coronet Sierra 2 door wagon - sure wish I still had that one!!!!!
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A real glutton for punishment I see.
Lew
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On Fri, 18 Dec 2009 19:36:45 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

You want to know what else fit in between them?
Some of them WERE punishment!!!
1928 Chevy, 1935 Chevy, 1938 Hudson Terraplane, 1961 Mini, 1949 VW Bug, 1972 Vauxhaul HC (Firenza) (AKA Magnum), 1967 Peugeot204, 1972 Renault 12 (rallye car), 1975 Pacer, 1965 Rambler Classic, 1972 Ambassador, ?? VW Rabbit, 1995 Pontiac TransSport, 1967 Chevy Nova, 1972 Dodge Colt,(Mitsubishi Gallant), 1982 Corolla wagon, 1981 Tercel, 1996 Mystique, 1989 and 1990 Aerostars plus a few motorcycles - not counting the company cars I've driven.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Meh? My ideal driveway for "drive it forever" cars would be filled with 50's Studebakers, 60's MoPars, and 80's VWs.
Sadly, IMHO cars hve gone downhill since the 80's in terms of durability and user serviceability.
nate
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wrote:

Definitely downhill on serviceability, but thankfully they require a lot less. As far as durability? Yes, the old ones took more punishment - but with minimal care, the new ones will outlast the old ones. No carbs to screw up (or screw around with) No points to wear ot burn, stainless exhausts and no phosphourous in the gas means mufflers and pipes often last the life of the car - and rack and pinion steering means no sloppy worn out steering boxes, idler arms, and pitman arms.
But yes, a Stude Golden Hawk, a '55 Chrysler 300, an early Paxon Avanti, a 1953 or 54 Coronet Sierra and a matching Coronet Coupe, a 1966 Plymouth GTX, a '64 Fury convertible, a 69 SC Rambler,and a 68 AMX would all be in "the stable" for me. Oh - and a '53 starliner coupe. With perhaps a 55-56 T-Bird and a GT350 Shelby, and possibly a 59-61 Vette.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Heh, my Studebaker has a full stainless exhaust from Silvertone and the distributor has been retrofitted with a Chrysler ignition pickup (used a '63-64 style Prestolite) also just picked up a freshly rebuilt steering box (the big, ugly Saginaw power thing - have pretty much given up trying to find a good manual box) for $300 a couple weeks ago :)
Now I just need to finish the darn thing, but I'm guessing that 245/60s and 12" of snow (and falling) don't mix well :(
If you're gonna get a t-bird, get a '57 with the whirly thing, and the 3-speed stick. I'm definitely a Paxton fan :)
nate
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wrote:

Oh, I dunno. I think the 56 T-Bird was the best looking of the lot. They weren't really performance cars, so looks trump everythng else for them.
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On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 09:07:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've had vehicles where I could climb right into the engine compartment to work on them.
These people talking about old cars being more durable must be youngsters. In the 1950's and 1960's, a car that lasted 100k and remained in pretty good shape was a bit rare and worth mentioning. Nowadays, you can buy a bottom of the line Toyota Corolla and expect that if you keep up with oil changes, it will go 200K without major trouble - and the body will still be intact.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

My dad's '67 Cutlass had about 300K miles on it when he scrapped it - and it still drove OK, but the frame was rusted above the rear axle. Probably due to having been used in western PA its entire life.
nate
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wrote:

Here in Ontario 10 years was doing VERY well for the sixties era GM midsise and up frames.
A unibody lasted a lot better.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:
-snip-

And it needed points & condenser every 2500 miles, distributor cap every 10k, plugs 5-10K?, plug wires in 20k, oil & filter change every 3K, tires that lasted 20K were a miracle. . . . and it cost more to buy one in real money.

My daughter's 98 Grand Am just cracked the 200K mark-- and that little 4banger sounds and acts like a new one. And the body-- well, we have replaced a fender that taught her not to drive too fast in the snow- but other than that the body has been fine. Pretty good for a car that spent its life in New York.
I remember having to have my 63 Impala painted in 1970 because the body was covered in rust holes. And I was impressed that the 283 was still good at 90k when the transmission died.
Yeah- they don't make 'em like they used to . . . and it is a good thing they don't.
Jim
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wrote:

I generally got 12K on points. The 170 Valiant ate spark plugs for breakfast until I discovdered NipponDenso W25EPU plugs. They were STONES as far as heat range goes - but they were the only plug I could keep in that car for more than 2000 miles.

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