retaining wall


i am planning on building a retaining wall using 4x4 P\T lumber. since some of the wood will be in contact with soil i'm thinking of applying some roof cement to the wood that will be touching dirt to hold the moisture at bay. yea or nay? thanks, cj
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cj wrote:

Don't know about that, but....
I had a 5 to 6 foot high PT 4x4 retaining wall put in over 15 years ago and it shows no signs of deteriorization yet.
The PT stock came with a "lifetime" guarantee about rotting out, but there was language in the guarantee which said all cut off ends had to be properly treated with anti-rot chemicals. I'm not sure if the guys I hired followed through with that, but so far so good.
I'm also not sure if today's PT lumber is as well protected as the stuff I got 15 years ago. I know there have been "safety changes" made in the chemical penetrants since then.
Can someone enlighten us about that please?
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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On 9/2/2010 6:13 PM, jeff_wisnia wrote:

I don't think the new stuff will last nearly as long with soil contact. I've got some in the ground for over 30 years with no problems but doubt it with today's treatments. I suspect coating will help somewhat.
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Best bet is to overdig, then line space behind the wall with filter fabric and fill with crushed stone. If there will be a lot of water behind the wall, you can put in perforated drain pipe below the stone, and direct the water to daylight if you can.
That'll also help with freeze thaw cycles if that's an issue in your area. Helps prevent the frozen ground from pushing the wall out.
HTH,
Paul F.
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Ahh your about to build your new perpetual project:(
The wall has moved time to rebuild
The wall is rotting time to rebuild
The wall looks kinda bad time to rebuild.
The wall............. and on and on and on:(
If the drop isnt to much your far better off to just slope the ground and plant something.
Unless your going to build a wall with a proper footer excavated far below grade, tons of gravel and drain lines behind the wall, using lifetime type materials and spend a fortune doing all this. in which case it might outlast you but a future owner will be rebuilding some day....
the best wall is the one that was never built:)
on disadvantages to walls heres another one a kid just fell off the wall were taking him to the ER, your homeowners insurance is good isnt it?
if the kid had slipped down the slope in ground cover he would likely be fine, perhaps some band aids?
the best wall is the one that was never built!
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If you can do it without cutting the ends it will last longer. I had to rebuild one in our yard after about 15 years. Rotted. Mostly in form the ends but a few pieces just rotted in general. Doesn't matter what they use, complete penetration is hard to get.
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Well if you INSIST on building a wall a far better choice is those precast concrete wall blocks, at least when rebuilding they can be reused..
Walls are just projects that go on and on and on..........
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and people build walls out of wood and other materials that dont hold up.....
but a properly engineered and built wall would cost so much few could afford it.
the best wall is one that was never built.
I have removed most of the walls here, and it looks better:) never requires any maintence:) and costs nearly nothing:)
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On 9/5/2010 4:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Agree that proper grading is the best answer whenever possible. But it ain't always possible, especially when working with an as-found fubar on a small subdivision lot. If you have a driveway cut on a non-flat not, you basically get to choose between a retaining wall or a PITA slope that keeps eroding, and is impossible to to mow or keep ground cover on. In cases like that, my preference is for one of those dry-stack interlocking block walls with gravel and drainage behind. If it ever does fall down, you can put it back together.
-- aem sends...
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