Resurfaceing Laminate Countertop with Concrete Overlay


At a home show I saw a business that resurfaced formica countertops with a layer of concrete/polymer blend to give it the look of solid surface. Unfortunately, the price was about the same as new granite slab, but I like the idea as a possible cheap solution to my ugly formica.
What I am looking for is: 1) a concrete recipe for the overlay 2) step by step instructions.
Has anyone ever completed this type of project? I know there are products like Flex-C-Ment that can be used as an overlay on formica, but you have to become certified to buy it or go through a certified contractor. I saw another site offering a class out of state, but was not willing to provide info unless i attend.
Given this info, this sounds do-able for a DIYer, but I need some help and instructions. The home repair community and I thank you for your responses.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I doubt if it is actual concrete but a setting (polymerization) of stones or colored particles in a resin like polyester or acrylic - the resins used for solid surface. Imagine using car body filler to make a counter top. The tough part would be mold integrity and finishing. It would be much easier to do the polymerization and surfacing in the factory such as done to make Corian solid surface than to bring the polymerization into your home. Chemical factories do not belong in your kitchen. I know of numerous reports of health problems blamed on Corian dust alone and this is just from cutting and machining. Acrylic or styrene monomers are not for the layman to handle in bulk. And, if any thing goes wrong and you have to redo, you'd have a mess on your hands. I would also be leery of the finished product holding up like the current solid surfaces on the market. Frank
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I have seen this done using styrofoam molds that covered the laminate countertops and then the polymer was poured/pumped in. The results, IMHO were less than stellar.
I recently bought a 10 yr old home, gutted and totally remodeled it. I placed porcelain tile over the laminate (aka formica) countertops with excellent results. The only thing in my home that I didn't do myself were my kitchen countertops where I used Monsanto solid surface (much like DuPont's Corian, but less expensive) countertops. I opted for the molded-in sink and we love it. It wasn't cheap but it cost less than the polymer mold you mentioned. I can't imagine why (unless you just adore the look of cement) you would want to go that route.
Jeff
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jeffreydesign wrote:

But, this is also interesting: http://www.counter-weight.com / Came up with googling this thread. "Readily accepts coloring" would also mean it stains easily but may not have the polymer disadvantages I mentioned. Frank
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