Residential electricity

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On Tue, 10 May 2016 12:20:04 -0700 (PDT), GARYWC

It is called the service point and typically that will be the crimps where an overhead drop connects at the drip loop or at the street in the case of a service lateral. You own the wire coming down the side of the house and the meter socket but they own the meter and they have common carrier power to seal the meter can.
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On Tue, 10 May 2016 16:24:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When I was a working electrician, we installed the "Service Entrance". That was the entrance HEAD, to the meter box (socket), and then to the breaker box. (And of course all the wiring in the building iteself). When we completed a job, we left around 3 feet of wire hanging from the entrance head. After the job was inspected, the power company came and ran the overhead wires from the pole to these wires at the entrance head, and crimped them together. Then they installed the meter in the meter socket and turned on the power.
So, the customers responsibility ended at the "service entrance head", (except the Power Co. installed and sealed the meter itself). It was always the same in all locations (in the USA).
I never ran into any underground service feeds, (they were not common in my area back in the 1970's-80's), so I cant comment on that, except that I would guess that the electrician installs the conduit from the meter box into the ground, and the power Co. installs the underground wire up into the meter box. (I could be wrong on that, since I never had to do it).
Also, all grounding rods and connections are installed by the electrician at the house location.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo Tue, 10 May 2016 20:40:39 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

That's how we do it here. As a final step I bend the service wires coming out of the freshly installed weatherhead so that it discourages water (if they get rained on) from trying to travel along the wire into the pipe. It's like a U with a tail in the front :) Or a sink trap for water... similar in shape. We've already passed the last inspection at this point. But, as a precaution, the line man will double check at the CAN. Just to be sure soon to be hot's aren't shorting and the neutral isn't shorting to either hot. I don't blame him either. The last thing I'd want to do is be plugging in a CAN knowing my pole transformer is up and going and something be... wrong inside that meter base wiring.
I really enjoy doing residential and commercial wiring. With a little industrial wiring tossed in for the occasional, odd job. With that said though, the line man and other people higher up the totem pole are playing with much higher levels of current than I am. :) I've got nothing but respect for them. I do respect the voltages I muck with as well; I'm aware of what they can do if disrespected, but, for sure, the line man has got to be that much more respectful.

We run the wire from the meter base can into pvc piping that's going to be underground when we pile the dirt back on it, to a plastic green box located near the road, not too far from the transformer pad.
Inside this box is where the power company taps onto the output lines coming from the transformer to feed your house. Each line has a boot and a short aluminum? based BUS that'll accept several wires on it. They just take one boot off, make the connections, put the boot back on, move onto the next. With the transformer up and going and various houses already pulling on it.
I haven't seen an underground one yet though that provided power to a single house. They're usually feeding four to six houses in a close proximity to each other. You can see the PVC piping going up the pole that contains the wires to power the transformer. We don't touch those.

Ayep.
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MID: <nb7u27$crn$ snipped-for-privacy@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
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May snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: "- show quoted text - It is called the service point and typically that will be the crimps where an overhead drop connects at the drip loop or at the street in the case of a service lateral. You own the wire coming down the side of the house and the meter socket but they own the meter and they have common carrier power to seal the meter can. "
Which begs the question: Who owns the flight from top of the house to the wires above the street?
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On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 8:51:10 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not sure what the issue there is, as the above paragraph say, the overhead service wire from the house masthead to the street is owned by the utility. At least that's the usual case, there might be some exceptions, somewhere.
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On Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 4:24:32 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'm going to muddy the waters a little ask a different question:
Who is responsible for the actual connection device that is attached to the house? i.e. the standoff and the support cable? The reason I ask is this:
A few years ago an ice event pulled the wires off of my house and damaged some of the vinyl siding. The standoff/insulator that got ripped out had been screwed through the vinyl siding and into the original clap-board siding of the house. This left a large hole in the siding.
When the utility company came to drop the service wires so I could replace the siding, the first thing the guy did was screw a new standoff through the trim board just below the eave, so that it was actually screwed into a rafter. This was a much more secure connection to the house.
I was thankful that he did it, but also surprised. Was he just being a nice guy or is the utility also responsible for the standoff and support cable that bears the weight of the service wire?
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On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 11:15:17 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I don't think there's a definite answer here. I think it depends on your l ocal utility.
On the campus with many buildings where I work, there is a term called "poi nt of demarcation" in the contract we have with local utility. Per contrac t, the point of demarcation is "typically" the service disconnect, or the 5 foot from building line, or or or. Some of the time it is pretty gray.
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On Wed, 11 May 2016 08:15:12 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

(or mast) and the "weatherhead". The "service bracket" generally attaches to the "mast" and the tension cable, carrier, or whatever you want to call it attaches to that.
On a gable end installation where the mast does not protrude above the roof, a 3/8" eye bolt is henerally specified to take the tension cable, and is normally notated as "customer supplied"
However, your line-man was responsible for installing the cable, and to "cover his ass" he made sure the cable was attatched to something substantial so he could not be blamed for the cable coming down in the future.
So yes, he was "being a nice guy" - the option was to refuse to install the service cable untill the eye bolt was installed, meaning another trip back, and the customer calling him a "prick" or worse.
There are still SOME service people who don't make "service" a "4 letter word".
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On Wed, 11 May 2016 15:08:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Considering the high cost of electricity these days, combined with the monthly "meter rental" price, it would be an advantage to the power companies to get the wires installed as quickly as possible, and no reason they cant bill the homeowner for a simple $2 eye bolt. But these days everything is based on black and while rules, with no gray areas, and no concern for the needs of the customer! As an electrical customer, you are nothing but a number. That's the customer ID on your bill!
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On Thursday, May 12, 2016 at 5:28:39 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

The exact opposite of how I was treated. If you had any reading comprehension you'd realize that my experience was a good one and I received services that I did not ask for and was not charged for.
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On Thu, 12 May 2016 17:04:07 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

visited the engineering department, they gave me a lot of free advice and a fee meter can. When it came time to swing over the service they came out, disconnected the drop and went to lunch. By the time they got back an hour later my connections were done and they crimped on the new SE I had installed. Very smooth for me and no charge.
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On Thu, 12 May 2016 17:04:07 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

provider he has had to deal with, so NEVER gets "the benefit of the doubt" and never gets any better service than the minimum required.
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On Friday, May 13, 2016 at 1:00:17 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

Probably a nice guy. I have found that true of many of them.
--
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Wed, 11 May 2016 15:15:12 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

The owner/electrician who performed the service work/installation.

He was being a nice guy and covering his ass in the future. :) Not to mention providing you great customer service. A win win win.
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MID: <nb7u27$crn$ snipped-for-privacy@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
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On Tue, 10 May 2016 12:20:04 -0700 (PDT), GARYWC

I think it ends at the lamp or the toaster.
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About 3 weeks ago, the lights on one circuit in my condo became much dimmer and the light bulbs flicker.
A response to a different post suggested having my local power company check their connections and wires before calling an electrician.
Would faulty power-company connections and wires affect only one circuit in my condo?
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Several weeks ago, the lights on one circuit in my condo became much dimmer and the light bulbs flicker.
A response to a different post suggested having my local power company check their connections and wires BEFORE calling an electrician.
Would faulty power-company connections and wires affect only one circuit in my condo?
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On Thu, 12 May 2016 09:27:26 -0700 (PDT), GARYWC

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