residential electrical question

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: <SNIP>

LOL Beautiful...
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On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 17:07:36 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This house was probably built about 1969.

I know someone who had an electric dryer installed about 2 years ago (in a house with no 240V wiring, only 120V). That electrician used a 3-prong connection.
I have seen one 4-prong device. It was for the big ceramic kiln my grandmother had installed about 1955. The elements could operate on low or high (I suppose low meant 120V and high was 240V).
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wrote:

If it is only a 120v load there is only going to be 3 wires. One hot, one neutral and one ground. You need the 4th if you have 120 and 240 volt loads in the same appliance. Two hots a ground and a neutral. Dryers usually have 120v timers, lights and blower motors with 240v heating elements. Ranges use 120v lights and timers.
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On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 20:50:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sorry for the misunderstanding. BEFORE getting the dryer, the house had only 120V service. The dryer itself required adding a 240V line.

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wrote:

How can a house built in 1969 only have 120v service? The code required 100a @ 240v long before that
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14/2 is rated up to 30A, go ahead its cool.
electric catbox to the laundry room. Only 1

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On Fri, 30 Dec 2005 20:06:48 -0500, "Rush Limballes"
Do you realize that news propagation is such that almost no one gets every post? So they may not get the other posts that correct you.
This post has no humor at all.
Your stupid answers are getting too stupid and if sometime someone believes you, you may kill him or his family. Are you 25 y.o. going on 12?

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wrote:

I found a table that says the allowable current for 14AWG (copper) is 15A. The table also shows 25A and 30A (with specific types of insulation).
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The higher ratings can help with derating but 2005NEC 240.4D generally limits #14 to 15A circuits.
bud--
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wrote:

But you wouldn't have posted what you just did without including the part in parentheses, would you? Because you're not irresponsible.
What you say is good to know, but the previous poster didn't say anything about needing special insulation -- and I'll bet you any money didn't know about the possibility -- and I'm sure the OP doesn't have special insulation. Yet he was told "Go ahead it's cool".
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wrote:

I wonder how hot 14AWG wire would get with a constant 30A current.
This reminds me of a post here from a few years ago. Someone had added a couple of receptacles in a garage. The circuit was wired with 18AWG lamp cord in the attic. He wasn't using a welder on it, but whoever bought that house might want to.
[snip]
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Depends on how much thermal insulation there is.
The free air melt current of bare 18ga is 100A. Yet, the "safe" current for insulated 18ga is around 5A.
Heavily buried in insulation, I'd expect a 14ga wire to melt with 30A continuous. In free air, it'd be difficult to tell it was getting warm.
14ga at 30A will be generating about .9W/foot. It's all a matter of heat dissipation.
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On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 16:26:03 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

If a copper wire in free air melted, you'd have hot drops of molten copper falling around. Some may even fall on you.
If a copper wire is well insulated, you get something very different. Liquid copper becomes a superconductor (as long as it's contiguous, and contained by plastic insulation). You can also obtain liquid state breakers (open circuit if current falls below threshold), switches, etc... at an electrical supply house (not available at Home Depot). Operating your wiring that way will greatly reduce your utility bills.
Note that the above paragraph is meant to be read only by knowledgeable, intelligent people who can determine it's state of truth. No idiots please.
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Well, yeah, if the overcurrent wasn't too high. If the overcurrent was high enough, instead of melted copper droplets, you get copper vapor and even plasma.
Not sure how that's relevant here tho.

Good joke.

Eg: it has no truth.
Copper doesn't appear on the super conductivity table at all. If it ever becomes superconducting, it's going to be only at temperatures infinitesimally close to absolute zero (-273C). It certainly ain't at copper's melting point 1084.62C.
I don't know of any plastics that stay together at 1084C.
Let's say that all of the above was true. It'd only save you a few percent of your electrical bill (in-house circuit losses of a few percent).
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 18:12:54 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

I suppose the mention of superconductivity was included to make the item's status as a joke more obvious.

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wrote:

Mark, 310.16 does show a 90c ampacity for 14gaa wire but that number is only used in derating calculations. For pretty much everything but special motor circuits the rule that applies is 240.4(D) in the overcurrent protectioon section. It says 14ga has to be protected with a 15a breaker (12ga 20a, 10ga 30a). The main reason for that is they know it will be the userr who decides what will get plugged in so they build in the recomended safety factor in the allowed breaker side. There is also another rule to apply. Romex can only be used as defined in the 60c column. (334.80) That applies to all sizes.
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On Fri, 30 Dec 2005 20:06:48 -0500, "Rush Limballes"
When asking a question on Usenet, please remember always to view trhe answers you get with a critical eye. The reply above is an excellent example of the reason why.
Greg Guarino
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It's difficult to know whether you are hearing from an experienced professional, or a fifteen-year-old brat with a little knowledge.
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wrote:

This is just a case where someone saw something in the NEC that they don't understand and they came to the wrong conclusion.
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yes. you have 15 amp 14/2 with no ground. you should have a grounded outlet for your washer. appliances like this are designated to be connected to a separate grounded circuit. white is supposed to be the ac common, and black the hot. by changing to a 15 amp gfi you will overcome the shock hazard from the ungrounded washer and keep the cat safe. if it pops when you plug the wahser into it your washer had an undiscovered shock hazard. an ac radio will help you find an unmarked breaker.
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