Residential Electrical Grounding - 2005 NEC

I'm upgrading the electrical service in my Minneapolis home from 60 amp to 200 amp. The service entrance, from weatherhead to the main panel, is installed. The next step is grounding the system. The 2005 NEC is unavailable in my library and I can't find a Minnesota Code resource and I want to know what is required for this step. All of the books I'm referencing (including Wiring Simplified and Rex Cauldwell's Wiring a House) seem to have variations.
I think I'm supposed to ground from the neutral bus bar to a water pipe within 5 feet of where it enters the house, and supplement it with a grounding rod. This would entail running 6 AWG copper from the main panel approximately 30 feet to a point near the water meter, then bonding to a grounding rod that's already in place a few feet away in a sump pit.
I would appreciate any advice on code requirements for this matter.
Thank you, Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You need to speak to the authority having jurisdiction in your area. In NY we would run a number 4 attached to the water pipe on the street side of the water meter with a jumper to the house side of the meter, then a separate number 4 to two ground rods driven six feet apart. Both conductors terminate at the neutral ground buss

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 22:11:57 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Although the ground rod conductor (the supplemental electrode), only has to be 6AWG, per 2005 NEC 250.53-E, using 4AWG means less restrictions to installation, due to possible physical damage.
Good idea.
later,
tom @ www.FindMeShelter.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Aug 2006 18:59:37 -0700, wrote:

The 2005 NEC is available online at: http://nfpa-acs-01.gvpi.net:8080/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7005SB
Here's a bunch of stuff on your state web site, which may or may not be helpful:
http://www.electricity.state.mn.us
Ain't Google grand? ;-)
--
Seth Goodman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a related question, my service was replaced and upgraded from 60 to 100 amp about 12 years ago. the grounding with rods and water line was all upgraded too.
if i go from 100 to 200 amp main do the ground system need replaced again?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As far as checking with the local authorities- they have been unprofessional and uncooperative. Perhaps they're overworked and underpaid, or maybe they don't like non-professionals doing this work.
Either way, I did extensive research before tackling this project and I had a few simple questions that just weren't clear in any of the books or online resources I consulted. Several phone calls to the Minnesota inspector's office have been met with short, curt answers- pretty much hanging up on me.
The MN State inspections site has absolutely no information pertinent to this question on it. In fact, it has practically no information on electrical codes at all.
The NFPA site you sent is for a resource to buy the code.
Thanks anyways for your replies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
23 Aug 2006 20:41:32 -0700, wrote:

No, it's the actual 2005 NEC, viewable from a Java applet. If it's not working for you, try reading the instructions here: http://nfpa-acs-01.gvpi.net:8080/rrserver/help_en.html
Possibly this link will work better for you: http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID=860&itemID=21227 &URL=Publications/necdigest/Review%20the%20NEC%AE%20online
or
http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z51112F9D
Click on the link that says "Visitors have online access to the 2005 National Electrical Code."
-- Seth Goodman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Aug 2006 20:41:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mytrashmail.com wrote:

You have learned a very valuable lession. Our local inspectors are very helpful, but I've heard teh nightmares people run into trying to get help.
the typical responses I hear: 1. We are not your boses, or you instructors. 2. You need to know how to do your job first before bothering us. 3. We enforce the codes, not work practices.
etc, etc, etc.
I understand why they do this, they only want highly competent trades people performing work. No DIY'ers.
Good luck with you aquiring of knowledge, but remember your inspectors are an important part to getting your work completed, and done safely.
later,
tom @ www.CarFleaMarket.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The conductors used in 100 amp service are to small for 200 and would have to be replaced

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks all for the advice. Seth- I was able to access the code, thanks. Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.