Residential door hardware with HIGH quality locks?

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Hello all -
I'm going to replace a front entry door before too much longer, trying to decide on good (not cheap) door hardware and locks.
I'll probably choose between Schlage, Baldwin and Emtek hardware.
I realize the locksets sold by Lowe's and Home Depot box-stores are at the low end of the product line.
Do the companies above market a "higher-grade residential" product line? If so, where can I buy them? Just locksmith shops?
What I'm looking for specifically: - single deadbolt and - lever (with key outside) Both keyed alike.
What I'd REALLY like is Abloy Protec cylinders inside, BUT -- I've seen NO residentially-styled door hardware with internal locks of this quality.
Perhaps I'm not looking in the right places.
Securitysnobs.com sells Abloy deadbolts and leversets, but the utilitarian styling is more suited to an industrial park.
There must be SOMEBODY that sells residential-styled hardware with quality locks. Or does one have to have stuff like that custom-assembled?
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On 3/1/2016 2:44 PM, John Albert wrote:

Are you mostly interested in "quality of manufacture"? Cosmetics? Security? etc.

I'm not sure as to the security of a lever-style "knob". I've been looking to replace ours with real "knobs" thinking you can't lean on them to force them to turn.
The lever is handy for places where you have your hands occupied and want to actuate it with an elbow, etc. (The inner door connecting garage to living space is a perfect place for this)

Yes, that was the problem I had with the garage/house door -- brushed nickel finish (really tacky but few choices given the other constraints I placed on the lockset)

You might be able to "reskin" the hardware. I.e., buy a lock of the desired security/quality and put new skin on it (from a cheaper "residential" lockset).
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the best change i made here was upgrading too touch pad locks. no key needed, just enter the code and were all in. fantastic in hard rain or zero weather..
you can buy a thousand dollar lock, but your home is only as secure as any glass window.
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On 3/1/2016 5:03 PM, bob haller wrote:

+1
Some years back, a new neighbor moved in. One (hot, summer) sunday, he knocked on the door (we'd not yet been introduced).
Seems he had locked himself out of house and his infant son was in need of getting out of the sun, etc. Locksmith wouldn't be showing up until "after the game".
I walked over to look at his house. Came back home to fetch a screwdriver. Removed *one* screw and dismantled his kitchen window: "Do you want to give ME a boost, in? Or, would you like ME to give YOU a boost?"
The look he gave me was one of mixed appreciation -- and fear! ("Who *is* this guy that he can break into my home so effortlessly? And, without even damaging anything??!")
Most people fail to remember that a thief cares very little about how much "inconvenience" he is causing you (getting the window repaired, etc.)
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It makes sense to buy quality locks so they last longer and don't fail.
It doesn't make sense in most areas to buy locks for security. Real burglars don't pick locks, they just kick the door down. Or break a window.
If you are more at risk than most of us for whatever reason, you need a burglar alarm and a dog.
I did make the mistake of buying a cheap lock at the big box store. I started installing it and realized there was no way I was putting this in my house. It was a matter of life and death survival - didn't want to die of shame.
I bought a more expensive lock, but not to deter burglars. They don't care.
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On 3/1/2016 7:45 PM, TimR wrote:

Exactly. Locks just keep honest people honest. An aunt had the entire door FRAME pulled out of her home to gain entry.

A lot of locks are trivial to "beat". And, those tricks have been widely circulated (so it's not like a bad guy won't KNOW them!)

Buy a lock (cylinder and mechanism) that isn't going to give *you* trouble in using it. And, for which you can readily cut more keys!
Years ago, I had Medeco cylinders on my deadbolts. Very fine quality. But, damn near impossible to get keys cut! <frown>
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On Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 7:03:39 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

We never carry house keys anymore.
All doors have touch-pad electronic locks. The entry door pads control the deadbolt, we don't bother locking the latch.
The garage door pad controls the opener.
One code, all doors. The odds of the batteries (or pads) dying on all doors at the same time is pretty slim. In fact, it's pretty easy to tell when the batteries are getting weak, so they get changed way before they die. I've never had a failure in the 5 years since we switched over to keypads.
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a deadbolt with a long shackle, one that not only goes thru the door frame, but thru a stud is a good idea. my moms home was vacant and someone tried to kick the door in, but the extra long throw deadbolt stopped them
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On 3/1/2016 4:44 PM, John Albert wrote:

The locks I've serviced over the years, Emtek is terrible poor quality. Baldwin is very well made, and they send parts n/c to me if the lock breaks. Schlage has several quality grades. Sounds like you might be suited with a B-160c, I think they are called. And an A line lever set.
Please also consider Arrow, which is good quality but lower priced than Schlage.
Please call two or three locksmiths near you (yellow pages) and ask them for ideas.
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Christopher A. Young
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My door guy recommends Emtek.
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On 3/2/2016 8:10 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

The back door, through the years it kept getting harder and harder to open and close. I finally got around to fixing it when I realized the doorknob was going to get pulled off if I didn't get around to doing what needed to be done. So it was drill, cut, chisel chisel, reset the strike plate etc. No more butt bumps to get it closed all the way or risk pulling the knob off to open it and next year I might even redo the weather seals. I suppose I'll have to do it all again in another 15 or 20 years.
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On 3/2/2016 9:10 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

As a locksmith, I've had Emtek locks apart. I think the quality is terrible.
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On 3/2/2016 8:47 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

And your opinion between Schlage and Baldwin?
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On 3/2/2016 9:51 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Baldwin (the ones I've worked on) have been very nice quality. As good as the Schlage high end locks (D line for knob sets, for example).
Actually, Schlage D line knobs / levers and the Baldwin are about equivilant. Both excellent.
I'm unsure what that converts to in Schlage deadbolts.
Baldwin and Schlage use the same keyway, depth and spacing. Most Schlage use the C keyway, which is same as Baldwin's keyway.
--
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You're not a locksmith, and your opinion doesn't match that of the professionals I deal with, nor does it match the general consensus on the internet.
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On 3/2/2016 11:17 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Opinion of one troll noted. Now, go play.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Scott Lurndal posted for all of us...

+1 Thank you!
--
Tekkie

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On 3/2/16 9:47 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

OK, as a locksmith, you're the guy I'll rephrase my question to.
I'm looking for RESIDENTIAL door hardware (I'd prefer a lever over a knob). I also want a separate single deadbolt lock.
Lever + deadbolt. Each with its own lock. Both keyed alike.
I DON'T want the cheap stuff. I'm willing to pay more. I won't say that cost is no object, but I'm willing to pay to about $250-275 for hardware/locks. Maybe a little more.
Which manufacturer should I be looking at? Again, this is for a home, not a business, etc. (insofar as styling is concerned).
OK, locksmith. What would YOU put on your own doors?
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On Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 12:33:03 PM UTC-5, John Albert wrote:

In some countries a lever is code, by the way. It has to do with disability access I think.
Having used both I prefer the lever also.
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On Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 12:47:00 PM UTC-5, TimR wrote:

Without a doubt. My entry doors are all lever. If I enough extra cash lying around, I'd change all the interior doors also. Kind of hard to justify just for the convenience though.
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