Reposition and adding new support poles

I am in the process of finishing my basement.
I currently have a 40 foot steel I beam being supported by a poured concrete foundation and 3 support poles to support the first floor of my home. One support pole is in an undesirable location for the designed floor plan.
I plan to replace the one support pole with two to correct this situation. The total span between the foundation and pole positions will not exceed 13 feet. I will be setting new footings for the two new poles being considered.
If done correctly will this repositioned and additional pole configuration cause any problems or harm to my home. What else should I beware of in considering this solution?
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One needs to know what is being supported by the beam and column arrangement. I suggest a structural engineer. The fee would be cheap insurance. TB
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You need an engineer to answer that. He must know the beam size and the load it is supporting. You don't give any of that information so anyone here would just be guessing.
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:I am in the process of finishing my basement. : : I currently have a 40 foot steel I beam being supported by a poured : concrete foundation and 3 support poles to support the first floor of : my home. One support pole is in an undesirable location for the : designed floor plan. : : I plan to replace the one support pole with two to correct this : situation. The total span between the foundation and pole positions : will not exceed 13 feet. I will be setting new footings for the two : new poles being considered. : : If done correctly will this repositioned and additional pole : configuration cause any problems or harm to my home. What else should : I beware of in considering this solution? : As a couple of people have indicated, you should have a pro look at the situation to be positive; that's a bigf investment you're working in. Sometimes "poles" have to be directly under the loads, sometimes not, stresses along the Ibeam aren't necessarily equal by any means, plus you haven't mentioned what's under the floor where you plan to put the new beams; it might be just a few inches of cement?
Or, I'd opt to make the problem pole a feature of the room somehow with some out-of-box thinking to work it into the overall. Perfection sometimes requires concessions in favor of function. I saw a house in Chgo once with a SLATE pool table that had a "pole" through it, right dead center. A newer game of pool, but fun none the less.
HTH,
Pop
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You may need no supports or you may need more, only an engineer or architect can say. I sized a steel beam replacement that allowerd the removal of 3 supports, one every 8 feet. Go with less only if you take exact spot measurements of floor to ceiling on every floor and monitor it for a year or more and every year to see if settling occurs, enginers-architects will over size you to not be liable. You might be oversized but who knows.
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"Go with less only if you take exact spot measurements of floor to ceiling on every floor and monitor it for a year or more and every year to see if settling occurs, enginers-architects will over size you to not be liable. You might be oversized but who knows. "
That's real reassuring!
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