Replacing valves where the water comes in

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Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

Hard tubing will simply crack if you try to flare it. In a pinch if absolutely necessary you can anneal it to flare it. Maybe the tubing you flared wasn't uniformly hard?
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I flared 1/2 straight water copper, many years ago, to make a carry handle. Don't know if it was k, l, or m copper. Was not on a roll like ACR copper.
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2008 14:28:38 -0800 (PST), Aaron Fude

Get most of it out by turning on the lowest faucet and the highest faucet. Is that what you mean?

I used bread with the water heater, where one pipe wouldn't stop dripping (even though I opened the faucet one the second floor. At least I think I did.) The bread worked quite well. I may have learned about it here. Maybe from you. Thanks, you or guys.

I don't know but I thought no one did that. I think it's probably harder that sweating it on.... To get it on, first you put it on and then you get it hot. You'll probably get it hot everywhere at once, but if you don't, you can still have a well sealed joint. To get it off, you have to get it hot, keep it hot everywhere, and pull it off while it's hot. You have to grab on to it to pull it off at the same time your other hand is keeping it hot with a torch, and yet not burn your first hand with the flame.
Then there will still be a layer of solder on the pipe, and maybe some little mountaings, which you can wipe off I think with a rag while it is hot enough, while somehow not burning your hand. If you don't get it off, you will have a hard to impossible time getting the new valve on.
I haven't soldered much pipe, but I have soldered a lot of electronics, and I used to try soldering things off. I have all kinds of desoldering tools and none work well**. I learned it was more trouble than it was worth most of the time. I think the same is true with water pipe.
Aren't you glad you asked?
**I have solder wick, a solder bulb, a soldering iron with a built in suction bulb, and a spring-loaded solder sucker. None of these things works very well and afaik none are available in water pipe size anyhow. What I usually do is heat and melt with a regular soldering iron, and then blow the solder off with a soda straw. That works for wire connections, but one can't blow the solder out of the tiny space between a pipe and a valve.
In this case, cut it off, on both sides. Leave as much as possible sticking out of the wall, and if you have neough room to maneuver the torch that you can solder the new valve onto the stub, you can do that, but you may need to add a couple inches of pipe to one stub or the other, to replace what got lost inside the valve when you cut the valve off.
Plus you need a coupler, whatever they are called. You should know that there are two kinds. One has a dimple inside, half way from one end to the other. These are very useful in new work, or in all but the last joint in most replacement work, because it makes it easy to slide the coupler on just half way. But it's a big problem where the pipes can't move apart. For that get the couplers with no dimple.
I didn't know they made ttehm with no dimple, plus I wanted to finish, so I wpent a lot of time trying to grind off that dimple, and it's amazing, considering how soft copper is, how little progress I made. I guess most of the time I never quite touched it.
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wrote:

OK, I'll grant that you can use pliers for this.
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If you try to unsweat an old valve on wet pipe, you will get a cloud of steam before the solder flows. Not necessarily a bad thing,
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turn it off for free and charge to turn it back on??? Sounds like bs to me. I'd turn it off myself.
as for getting the water out, once you cut the old valve off, then the water may run out on its own. If it's a horizontal line, and it won't quit dripping, then stuff a measure of bread down the line, and do your soldering. Then the bread will dissolove when you turn the water back on. (or when the man does, if you decide to wuss out and pay)
s

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On Thu, 18 Dec 2008 19:09:30 -0600, "Steve Barker"

Doesn't the man have a 5-sided socket wrench?
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Yes, and a four or five foot long snakes tongue tool to turn the valve stem.
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If you can find the curb shut off. And if you can find a place to buy the specialized tool, that is. It's not just a crescent wrench, after all.
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