replacing normal breaker with AFCI breaker

Doing bathroom rewiring and had to get a new breaker for my electrical panel. Got both the AFCI breaker b/c I figured it's basically good insurance and looking at the details and it says "you must have a licensed eletrician do this!". But it appears to me that it's pretty straightforward. Wanted to make sure.
It looks like the hot line of the circuit goes into the breaker, the neutral from the circuit goes into the breaker (instead of the bus), the pigtail curly-q neutral out of the breaker goes into the neutral bus, and it hooks in just like the normal breaker onto the bus. I'm assuming the ground from the circuit also goes into the ground bus (which on my panel is on the same bus as the neutral).
Yes, I know to stay away from the main two incoming lines as they're still hot, and to turn the main power off, and to be careful.
But am I missing anything else?
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Seems like you've got it handled OK. FWIW, the fussier journeymen don't like grounds and neutrals on the same bus. Newer design panels have larger separate buses for neutral and ground. If you want to make an electrical inspector happy, show him an older panel with installed extra buses for the separation. But the best argument for the DIYer adding them is to simplify circuit changes and upgrades in future years. HTH
Joe
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AFCI protection is for bedrooms, until the 2008 code kicks in, GFCI protection is for bathrooms.
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But it won't hurt anything to be above code right? The two provide different types of protection. I've got the gfci covered
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But it won't hurt anything to be above code right? The two provide different types of protection. I've got the gfci covered
I don't know. You could be creating a situation that may cause nuisance tripping
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...
Please, what *is* an AFCI? (First time I've seen that name.)
And how does it differ from a GFCI?
And, what's the 2008-code that's gonna kick in sometime?

How so?
Thanks!
David
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| >> AFCI protection is for bedrooms, until the 2008 code kicks in, GFCI | >> protection is for bathrooms.- Hide quoted text - | >> | >> - Show quoted text - | > | >But it won't hurt anything to be above code right? The two provide | >different types of protection. I've got the gfci covered
| Please, what *is* an AFCI? (First time I've seen that name.) | | And how does it differ from a GFCI?
AFCI - Arc fault circuit interruptor. Breaks the circuit if it notices an arc situation, such as a worn power cord allowing hot to contact live. A GFCI would not trip under though circumstances. These are mainly to prevent arcs/sparks that start fires.
GFCI - Ground fault circuit interruptor. Breaks the circuit if it notices a differencial between hot and live, meaning power is leaking to ground someplace up the circuit. These are mainly to prevent shocking people.
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CB wrote:

I'm not sure. Some AFCIs incorporate a GFI (but not at personnel-protection levels, at equipment-protection levels.) therefore you might end up with multiple trips if you ever have a ground fault. You'll find out when you test it for the first time :)
nate
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I'm confused.
From mikeholt.com ( http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/AFCI-HTML/HTML/AFCI_-_Update~20021209.htm ) Is it okay to replace a regular circuit breaker with an AFCI circuit breaker if there are GFCI receptacles on the circuit in question? Yes. The GFCI receptacle should not interfere with the AFCI protection circuitry.
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I'm confused.
From mikeholt.com ( http://www.mikeholt.com/mojonewsarchive/AFCI-HTML/HTML/AFCI_-_Update~20021209.htm ) Is it okay to replace a regular circuit breaker with an AFCI circuit breaker if there are GFCI receptacles on the circuit in question? Yes. The GFCI receptacle should not interfere with the AFCI protection circuitry.
So what are you confused about? You asked a knowledgeable source a question and got a definitive answer. Stop procrastinating and get some work done
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You cant use a GFCI outlet with a GFCI breaker. I suspect it probably is the same using an AFCI breaker with a GFCI outlet.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

All AFCIs are required (UL) to have ground fault protection at a 50mA level (commonly provided at 30mA). (GFCIs are 5mA.)

As Mike Holt (link) and RBM said, you can put a GFCI outlet downstream from an AFCI breaker.
You can also put a GFCI outlet downstream from a GFCI breaker or another GFCI outlet.
With a GFCI outlet downstream from an AFCI (or GFCI), a ground fault could trip both. The GFCI test button should not trip the AFCI (or upstream GFCI).
Note that the Mike Holt link dates from 2002. AFCIs have been required, since 1-1-08, to detect series arcs (loose connections).
In the 2008 NEC, AFCIs are more or less required on circuits where GFCIs are not required (residential 15/20A 120V). AFCIs are not required (but can be installed) for bathroom receptacle circuits.
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