replacing main shutoff valve on incoming house water line

Page 2 of 2  


Or it may mean double work later on when it starts leaking. Its a chance you have to decide whether or not it is a risk worth taking. If you are willing to take that risk why mess with the thing to start with.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Or it may mean double work later on when it starts leaking. Its a chance you have to decide whether or not it is a risk worth taking. If you are willing to take that risk why mess with the thing to start with. ========================================== Wouldn't it just require repacking the stem nut? No biggie.
--
EA


Jimmie



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Plumbers frequently use bread stuffed in the pipe to sop up moisture long enough to do the soldering, then the bread will dissolve and there is no need to try to pull or get anything out of the pipe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jake wrote the following:

All I use for plumbing is the propane torch. You might want to clean all that paint off beforehand. It will stink when burned. You have to make sure that once you melt the solder, you have some room to lift the pipe off, otherwise the shutoff valve will just get stuck between the pipes. Another alternative is to cut the pipe some distance from the valve to lift the pipe off, then use a coupler. Make sure the pipe is empty of water, or else you will be there all day trying to melt the solder.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Good luck getting a compression fitting to seal on that scuzzy looking pipe!!! You need the pipe CLEAN AND SMOOTH for that. I'd cut the pipe and splice in as needed to solder the new valve - with the pipes completely dtained and dry. With water in the pipe you will NEVER get the soldered joint melted off.,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, at least the part of the pipe which is presently in the sweat fits, might be usable. If it were heated, and wiped clean of old solder.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
To answer your question.... yes, probably. If not, a mapp torch will do the job.
You didn't ask, but..... replacing a sweat valve with compression makes a leak very very likely.
Cut out some tubing near the main shut off would work. But, not with painted copper tubing.
If this were my job, I'd want to enlist someone who has plumbing experience, and replace with a solder-on valve. Or if it's just failing to shut off, try a faucet washer.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 17:19:55 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Or just find a new identical shut-off valve and replace the whole "cap" leaving the original body. A ball valve is a lot less troublesome if you do end up having to replace it, but just replacing the "guts" is a lot less work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a similar problem. The water main valve is leaking around the stem. Finding a replacement packing is unlikely based on my past experience with 30+ year old plumbing. And, there's only a quarter of an inch between the main valve and the concrete wall, so there's no margin for error if I have to sweat on a new valve.
What about inserting a new ball valve downstream of the old valve. Then shut off the water at the curb, open the old valve, remove the cap, and insert epoxy into the valve stem packing to stop the leak? Will this work? Other suggestions? Your thoughts. . . .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can buy generic packing material, which seems to be a kind of impregnated synthetic string material. Or, you can make your own with string and pipe dope.
Proly the wide variety of O-rings available would fit the bill, as well. Packing shouldn't be a big deal.
--
EA


>
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jake wrote:

Besides all the other good advice, a new, run of the mill Bernzomatic torch only puts out about half the heat of the older ones. So if you do this, I wouldn't count on the cheapest Bernzo to do the job. The better ones do get a bit expensive. And as far as the bread to stop the pipe dripping, they now sell stuff made for that purpose. I think it's something close to the corn starch packing peanuts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of the best torches I have found short of using oxygen is one designed for making glass beads. I bought mine at the Hobby Lobby. it really cooks on MAPP.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The Bernzo "turbo torch" is the cat's meow - and particularly when running MAPP Gas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, I have one of them also, I think. The kind without the hose. I forgot how to adjust it. I think you always open the fuel valve all the way, then adjust the valve on top for the proper flame? Does that sound right? With propane it's enough for most plumbing jobs, with the MAPP gas I've done brazing quite a few times.
http://www.handhelditems.com/bernzomatic-jt539t-swirl-flame-brazing-multiapplication-torch-p-57076.html
Mine is very similar but much older. The top valve is brass like the rest of it. I think I bought it around 1990?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Mine only has one valve, and generally when doing plumbing I run it opened just far enough to be LOUD.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jake, I have been installing softeners, and plumbing for 35 years, retrofitting all the time in old houses, old plumbing, you name it, I have just about seen it all. If you haven't started yet, I will be glad to give what advice I can. From the picture, I see that your current pipe is 1/2 inch from the wall. Pretty close, but not insurmountable. Would you be wise to put in a new valve further upstream, and leaving the old vlave there? Is it leaking? Does it shut off all the way, or do you REALLY have to shut it off at the street? Is this new valve in a place where everyone can see it? I like to be neat, but can it be done without it looking good? A crawl space, you can make it just work without looking good, out in a room? We can make it look good too.....let me know if I can help......I do have a few tricks up my sleeve to help you more than the average do-it-yourselfer..... I am like some of the other posters, I prefer using a sweat joint, but with a difference I would use a male adapter, and then threading on a ball valve (you can take the handle off to turn it onto the male adapter) that way it could be replaced later without any sweating. There are more tricks after you get the valve on, I will expand later if you go this route. you can contact me directly, Tom
snipped-for-privacy@bbc.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/replacing-main-shutoff-valve-on-incoming-house-water-line-437705-.htm Lkdvm03 wrote: I have a question, I had my hot water heater replaced, we couldn't get the cold water tostop dripping. We tried the main shit off valve and it just kept turning. My plumber was able to install the heater, but the water pressure was low. Today the pressure of ok. He wanted to charge me $650.00 to replace the valve. Should I change it out even though the water pressure seems ok and what do you think about the price. He says he has to drain the water in the whole house frist even the water tank. Can't you just shut off the water at the street level. nefletch wrote:

plumbing for 35 years,

about seen it all. If

picture, I see that

insurmountable. Would you

there? Is it

street? Is this new

be done without it

good, out in a room?

a few tricks up

using a sweat joint,

on a ball valve (you can

could be replaced

valve on, I will

september.org...
produce enough heat to

purchased a pressure collar

remove the old collars

------------------------------------- Lidia norris |> |> | | III |> /-|\\ III i> | _|__|__III i ^ |>\\______/III i ^^^ | !__!__III/\\ ^^^^^ /\\ ////|====IIII == /\\/////|====IIII == | | ||||::::::IIII == | | |||| IIII ==----------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.