Replacing light controlled by 2 switches

I'm replacing the overhead light in my kitchen. The old light has been removed to reveal a total of 8 wires in the ceiling (four pairs of 2). I have tested these 8 wires and only 1 is hot.
Two switches contol the light. Those have been left in the wall and not touched (the old light was working fine). Also, there is one wall outlet that appears to be included in the circuit, since it does not work now that the ceiling light has been removed.
I realize it would have been best to mark the ceiling wires before disconnecting them from the old light.
My question is, how to I properly wire the new light fixture?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How old is the house? Pull the swithces and post what you find. Sounds like a California 3 way at first glance...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rick wrote:

I purchased one of those light sockets with two wires connected to it to test if I have the wires coming out of the ceiling connected correctly. I have been able to connect two ceiling wires to the black wire of the light socket and two to the white wire of the socket and the light turns on. Problem is the light is ALWAYS on and there are still 4 more loose wires hanging from the ceiling.
For the remaining four wires, A and B are paired together in a metal sheath and C and D are paired together. If I touch the electrical tester to the hot wire from the ceiling, it glows bright when I touch A or B, and glows dim when I touch C or D. If I flip one switch and touch the hot wire and A, the glow chenges from bright to dim as the switch goes on and off. Nothing changes when I do the same with wires B, C and D from the ceiling.
Looking more closely, I now think there are wires from the two switches and two outlets all coming out of the ceiling. That's why there are 4 sets of two.
Unless someone has some good ideas, I'm giving in and calling the electrician next week.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your explanation is not clear enough for us to give you a definitive answer.
For example, you say that there are 8 wires, four pairs of 2. Obviously, you don't need all these wires for the overhead light. Some of these wires are just passing through in order to get to other fixtures or outlets. There must be 2 pairs, wire-nutted together to which your fixture was connected. If you remember which two pairs, that's all you need to know.
Also, you say that a wall outlet isn't working anymore. Normally, removing just the light fixture shouldn't have affected the wall fixture at all. What this tells me is that you removed some wire-nuts in order to remove the light fixture wire, and that you didn't put the wire-nut back on the original pair, thus cutting power to the wall fixture.
You need to wire your original pairs together, and then map your circuits. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone who does to help you out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Common mistake: disconnecting all the wires without marking or recording how they were originally connected. Sorry, you are on your own. It is a fair amount of work to trace out which are connected to switches, live feed and others that may go to receptacles. You start by grouping the wires by matching the cables that come into the box. Unfortunately there are a number of different wiring techniques for hooking up three way switches. You probably need to buy a book on wiring that explains the different methods and wire colors. If this is still too much, get an electrician in. When all the proper connections are done, pigtails should be provided to connect the light fixture with, so that future removal does not entail disconnecting everything again.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The thing to have done is note only the wires that were attached to the existing fixture and install the new one the same. If you've separated all the wires, you probably need to call someone

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RBM wrote:

Even some one(a pro) will have to spend some time to figure it all out. Just take time and sort it out yourself. Next time be logical and you know what to do, LOL. Good luck, Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.