Replacing kitchen sink disposal

Hi. My 3/4 hp GE sink disposal just died. If it's not too difficult of a task I'd like to replace it myself (let me know). The unit is the kind without a wall switch, you place a drain cover/lid into the sink notch and press it down to operate.
I'm thinking the hardest part is removing the old unit, and the hardest part of that is disconnecting the unit from the sink.
Any thoughts/suggestions on degree of difficulty and anything I should watch for? I'm relatively handy around the house.
Thanks, Walter
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You'll want to buy a nice Insinkerator, and you'll need a switch. Is the wiring arranged so that will be reasonably easy? (No tearing out walls and hiring a crain operator)
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Why would he need a switch? All he needs is another unit like the one he's replacing. Insinkerator makes those, too.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Walter Cohen wrote:

Google "replacing disposal". There are some helpful tutorials.
And this one about "batch feed" models: http://www.appliance411.com/parts/showcase.disposal.shtml
Jim
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On Thu, 6 Mar 2008 19:26:01 -0500, "Walter Cohen"

Not difficult at all. For the inexperienced maybe an hour. It is an extra step if there is another sink or dishwasher that drains into the disposal. The switch installation might take an extra hour depending where you want the switch. I recommend putting the switch in a convenient location to operate the disposal, not necessarily convenient to install. Double check that the circuit is OFF before starting the task.
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No, I really prefer to NOT have a switch. I have the batch feed model now.
Walter
wrote:

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re: I recommend putting the switch in a convenient location to operate the disposal
There are those (including me) who think it's better to put the switch in an inconvenient location. I don't mean on the other side of the room or up near the ceiling. I mean just not right next to the light switch for the sink light. I put mine on the opposite side of the sink, behind the dish-rack.
You have to *want* to turn on the disposal, not accidently turn it on, in case there's a utensil or some other object that you weren't looking for 'cuz you weren't thinking about the disposal.
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It is a fairly straightforward job, but in cramped quarters.
I see others say you need to install a switch, You don't. Just be sure to buy a model that has the integrals switch like you have. They are batch feed as opposed to the continuous feed. Good brands are In-sink-erator and Kitchen Aid. This is a batch feed http://www.insinkerator.com/product/product.php?id 4&template=hhd
Getting the old unit out will require a little planning because once you release it, it suddenly becomes heavy so you don't want to twist your wrist. Most times there is a collar that has to be turned off with a screwdriver or allen wrench.
Figure about two hours for the job. Unplug or turn off the power first.
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Thanks. Actually, I think the grinding motor is not the part that failed, instead I believe it is the batch feed switch that failed. I used the disposal this morning and tonight my wife said it no longer works (verified).
Unfortunately, as the motor does not run anymore I'm going to have a hard time determining what circuit breaker it is on (as lots of the breakers do not have any indications on them). I can throw most of the breakers for the kitchen and hope that the previous owner/contractor/handy man did not run a separate line for it to a separate unmarked breaker.
What I may need to do is throw most of the known kitchen breakers, then take the electrical cable connector off at the disposal and use a multi-meter to check for voltage on the wires before removing. Obviously use rubber gloves and a rubber handled screwdriver.
Walter

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Walter Cohen wrote:

Have you checked/reset thermal protection switch on the motor body(under side). It pops when over loaded. You have to push it to reset.
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Yes, I tried that switch but it doesn't have any effect.
Walter

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wrote:

It's fairly heavy to put back in also. To lift back up.
Let's put it this way. When I was 45 neither dropping nor lifting was much effort.
When I was 60, I decided to use s floor jack to lift the thing up to put it back in.
I don't know if I had gotten weaker or smarter.
It worked well because unlike most bumper jacks which work in increments, one can raise a floor jack as little as one wants.
A floor jack is one that looks like an alligator, with four wheels sticking out like legs, and a handle at one end that represents the tail and cranks up and down. Mine is the cheapest smallest model I've seen but works great for things like this and lifting up the wooden deck at my back door (and for lifting the car)
I wouldn't buy one just for this job, especially if you are closer to 45 than to 60.
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I live in an apartment with an on-site maintenance crew. When my garbage disposal needed to be replaced, I watched. It looked relatively easy. The entire process took about 20 minutes. I also helped my dad replace the garbage disposal in his kitchen and it didn't take much longer. The directions on how to do it should be included with the disposal.
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me a couple of times. Taking the old one out is not a big problem but getting the new on and locked onto the sink can be a pain in the butt and very tiring. What I've done is to use a small auto scissors jack--Once you've connected the wiring, balance the disposal on the jack and (very) carefully raise it up by turning the jack adjustment by hand. Be very careful that you don't raise it too high once you get it up to the sink or you'll start to push up on the sink itself. Once it's in position the task of locking it onto the sink is a heck of a lot easier than if you were trying to support all that weight with one hand. MLD
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I'm glad I'm not the only one using a jack. I was holding it with both hands, trying to find the right spot, and twist it on, but it was taking a long time
I dind't connect the wires until it was in place, which is easy enough, but maybe if my cable were longer, I would do it first.
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Thanks for that tip!
Walter

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you should have a wall switch to make sure their is no power to it and its a simple process to disconnect it. Follow the order that you use to disconnect it, good luck henry
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you should have a wall switch to make sure their is no power to it and its a simple process to disconnect it. Follow the order that you use to disconnect it, good luck henry
But a wall switch is NO guarantee that power is not going to it.
What I've done is put receptacles under the sink and the DW and disposal have plugs for them. That way I can be sure of now power.
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Actually, it's pretty easy with the possible exception of it being gunked/rusted in place. Look at the connection before you start and see if it is corroded and if you will need something like WD-40 to free it.

When you buy a replacement it will come with detailed instructions on installation and probably helpful tips on removing the old one. At least it did when I replaced one in my old house. Be sure the replacement you get is high quality; cheap ones tend to rust out.
I don't remember it being difficult to lift into place and I certainly didn't need a lift as others have suggested.
Are you sure the old one it is hardwired and there's no outlet hidden under the sink or counter somewhere?
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