Replacing gas line to gas light

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A technitian from our gas company told me that gas pipe line to a gas light in our garden is leaking and needs be repaired. I dugged up lawn to expose the entire line of 100 feets and found multiple leaking spots. A yellow plastic pipe is used except short length of one end section which is copper pipe. I am going to have the entire line replaced by a single copper pipe. I am wondering if this is something I can do myself. It appears not so difficult. Is there anyone who did this?
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Electric will probbably save you money, is very DIY friendly, and you can install a timer or light sensor to pick its on times.
With compact fluroscent lamp its very efficent too, and can be briter than a gas lamp, with no leaks ever
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Electric is definitely easier but it's not quite as romantic is it? I guess it depends on whether the lamp is used in a decorative situation. I think gas lamps that show the flame are really neat additions.
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 08:30:22 -0500, Richard Thoms

Romantic ???? Some expensive gas burning in a jar...... How is that romantic?
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wrote:

I remember walking around here one night when the electricity was off. A few people still had lights in their yards. Those were gas lights.
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Mark Lloyd
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Many places require that a certified gas fitter do the work. Also, I really would question using copper line. Plastic would probably last longer.
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If you have to ask, you probably shouldn't do it. Learn first under the watch of a skilled person, then do it. Gas is not something you want to experiment with. Local codes may prohibit you anyway.
The most difficult part is digging the line up. You already did the hard labor, get a pro to make the connections for you.
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gas may look romantic but burning it 24 / 7 is wasting a valuable natural resource
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Thanks to all responded.
The light is serving as ornamental purpose as well and our Home Owner Association does not allow us to change. Anyway it looks very aesthetic and we like it.
We aggree to that gas light is wastfull since it is on even during the day time.
It is true we did the hardest part of the work. We are leaning towards letting a pro to do the the rest but I just wanted to ask about DIY route.
Do I better off using plastic rather than copper? Our present gas leak problem is due to clacks on the pipe. The clacks appears caused by tree roots either pressing or pinching the pipe.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't know where you are located or what the local code is, but I can tell you this. Here in the USA the gas companies use plastic piping for lots of natural gas applications. On the other hand, I've never seen them use copper. As I recall, there are issues with components contained in the natural gas causing copper to corrode. Before you do anything, I would check the local codes, as it's easier to do it right the first time, rather than do it all over again later.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My location is suburbs of Atlanta. The total distance between the meter and the light is about 100 feet. Presently a 1/4 dia copper tube of about 6 feet from the gas meter is used and the rest is a 1/2 dia yellow plastic pipe. A short piece of tube which comes out from the light fixture is also a 1/4 dia copper.
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On 15 Jun 2006 08:39:16 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Tell your homeowner association to take a hike off a cliff and explain to them that you care about our natural resources and if they dont like it, maybe the DNR in your state will contact them. There is no reason to waste gas 24/7.
Copper is a better choice for pipe
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1/4" copper should be just fine. Copper and black iron is all that was used until we came up with the yuppified plastic shit.
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Steve Barker


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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The gas company in my area required everyone to take them out of service at least 15 years ago because they are wasteful.
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Many years ago, our street had gas lights. They were off during the day and the lamplighter came around at dusk and lit them. This was in Philadelphia, in 1950
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Yeah nearly every gas lamp was removed by law here too.
The OP may find a minimum bury depth for the new line. If he goes with plastic and it crosses any area where it might get damaged I would put it in conduit pipe for mechanical protection
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And don't forget to run a wire (usually yellow) along with the plastic pipe, so that it can be found by a metal detector in the future.
That is what the local gas company does when they replace the line to a house.
-- If I had something witty to say, this is where I'd say it.
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On 15 Jun 2006 05:54:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You already did all the hard work by digging. Put in new pipe and cover it over with the dirt. Why even ask?????
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With price of gas these days it would be better to go electric, at least bury an electrical line next to the gas line so you could easily switch in the future.
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