replacing electrical plugs

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Chip C wrote:

Kitchen countertop outlets should be GFCI.
It may be possible to use a GFCI outlet to protect outlets downstream.
If you change an outlet to GFCI - they take more volume. You may have to very carefully fold the wires into the box to efficiently use the space. (You may have to do that with other outlets too.)
If there is not a ground wire to the outlet it may be best to come back and describe what you have. For example, a metal box may be grounded and a "self grounding" outlet can be used. If there is actually no ground, 2 wire receptacles (with no ground) can also be used.
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Goog wrote:

Don't buy the cheap outlets. Get "spec grade" or equivalent. They will hold the plug better, and will last way longer.
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Typically, you replace a plug this way:
1) Remove plug from socket. 2) Cut the old plug off, as close to the old plug as possible. 3) Follow the provided directions, to strip, wire, and close the two parts of the plug. The sales guy at the hardware store should be able to coach you, if you need further help. 4) Put the plug back into the socket.
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Have you done this lately? I have, to replace plugs on the end of appliance wires. These appliances were dual voltage but came with Euro style plugs and I couldn't find adapters for US outlets, so I changed the plugs.
I tried the big box and I tried the specialty hardware stores. You can no longer find decent quality plug replacements. I recommend a different strategy - if you can, replace the whole cord with a cannibalized good one. (There may be some electrical contractor stores that have good stuff, but I didn't find any.)
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Thanks so much to those who replied. I planned to buy my own place at 22 yrs old and as soon as I graduated. I just did. I will come back here for more advices since I'm trying to do some minor repairs myself.
Thanks so so much.
Angela
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On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 11:26:50 -0700 (PDT), Goog

Try posting from a real news server NOT Google. Some people have Google (note that's NOT Gmail) because it's a source of spam.
BTW, the word "plug" refers to the MALE connector on the cord not the thing in the wall.
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Sam E wrote:

You just embarrassed 50 million people. Seriously, I think more than half of the people in the US call a receptacle/outlet a plug. Quite a few call it a "plug in" also.
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wrote:
[snip]

"Wall plugs" are for holiday decoration, for lighting up unwanted guests :-)
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wrote:
[snip]

That would be the "majority virus". The way that idea (the ****** idea that the majority is always right) keeps getting passed around.
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wrote:

Actually an electrical professional would call the male part a cord cap and that plugs into a receptacle.
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On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 11:26:50 -0700 (PDT), Goog

It is a lot of bother, but it can be done. Make sure the circuit breaker is OFF whenever the cover plate is removed. An outlet without a cover plate is out of code. Pickup a plug tester at HD, about $10.
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