Replacing attic insulation

I have a house that was built in the 1950's and looks like it has the original fiberglass insulation in the attic. I would like to take out the old and install new insulation but the joists are only 2x6's and the recommended R-value for Connecticut is R-48 in the attic. I did not know if I could toe-nail another 2x6 on top of the originals to get me up to 11" so I can use some R-38. What other options do I have? I want to keep the storage space up there so blown insulation is not an option. This project was going to wait until this fall but while installing some recessed lights in the kitchen I pulled back some of the insulation in the attic and found quite a few termites or flying ants. Now when the exterminator gets here I want to pull all the insulation out of the attic so I can have the problem eradicated without question. So it looks like I need a solution to my insulation problem now instead of this fall. I also noticed that the 3/8" drywall in the ceiling below the attic has a 1/2" black, fiber-like material backing it. Is this a form of insulation and if so how would I figure out it's R-value?
Any help would be wonderful!
Thanks, Bruce
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Bruce E. Harang II wrote:

Why remove the original fiberglass insulation? What do you want to replace it with. It does not wear out.

You could build a 2x6 platform over the existing structure and add another 6 inches. I might suggest blown in as that tends to seal air leaks better.

If you get a good exterminator, I doubt if you will need to pull up the insulation. Let the exterminator decide. Make sure you get a good one with references and licensees and insurance. Then make sure he insures your job. The treatment for termites greatly depends on the type and the area you are in.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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11" will get you to r 38.5 apx. Leave the old its a mess to work in it. also figure in a settling % maybe 10%
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afaik insulation must be rated at its 'after settling' r factor. when its new its a little higher and it settles out to its rated value.
randy

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Attic insulation is rated full fluff not after settle, thats a HO problem, I put in r 110 but in reality its R 90. It is rated at "its Maximum potential " not how it settles or can be screwed up, by compression.
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Attic insulation is rated full fluff not after settle, thats a HO problem, I put in r 110 but in reality its R 90. It is rated at "its Maximum potential " not how it settles or can be screwed up, by compression.
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I was planning to remove the old insulation because it is compressed almost flat as well as missing in some areas. If it's better to leave the old stuff in I can do that but I am not worried about messy or hard work if the right way is to remove the old and install all new insulation.

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Bruce E. Harang II wrote:

Fiberglass compressed almost flat????? How did that happen? Was something stored on top of it?
In any case, I suggest leaving it and filling above it. If you have 10" of fiberglass and compress it to 5" you will get about half the insulation value as it had at 10" So just leave it and blow in additional above.
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