Replacing al wiring.

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Codes are revised every couple of years. So there's always a new one in the making. When you buy your copy of the orange book, it'll say which revision of the CEC it corresponds to. If the orange book date _itself_ is less than 2-3 years old, you have the right one.

It's not so much accessibility of J-boxes (which is required of course),
with more than, er, 1M (~39") I think of headroom, because they're a snag hazard. There's other stuff about headroom, etc. Most of these rules are similar to the NEC, but the details are different.
The rules aren't onerous, and inspectors do give some leeway, the book will help him understand the simple rules he should follow about wire and box placement.

P.S. Knight's books are somewhat unique.
In both the US and Canada, there's an official national code (US: NEC, Canada: CSA CEC), and usually it's adopted and amended somewhat for each state (or province), and municipality.
Most of the "Wiring Simplified" books in the US and Canada are generalized books that don't get into fine detail, make no allowance for regional variation, and may be based on codes that are years out of date. In some cases, following these books to the letter will be wrong for your location, and to be 100% accurate you have to either have the real code on hand ($$$), or ask an inspector a lot of questions.
P.S. Knight, on the other hand, publishes what is defacto the official "electrician's training manual" for Canada, with different versions for each provincial code, and is updated in full synchronization with the code revisions. The DIY book I'm recommending is similar - each province has a different version, and it's updated in sync with the corresponding official code.
For a Canadian who is asking basic questions, you can _never_ be wrong recommending the PS Knight "Electrical Code Simplified" (ECS) book that they can obtain in most hardware/DIY stores in their province.
As the ECS obsoletes fast (every 3-5 years), it's produced cheaply, uses hand-drawn (kinda primitive ;-) diagrams and is quite inexpensive. It doesn't have fancy binding or extensive color photos of each motion needed to twist two wires together. It won't win any design awards.
It's a cheaply produced paperback book full of scribbles.
Until the last edition it looked _almost_ like it was done with a manual typewriter in bad need of readjustment, primitive charcoal cave drawings, and photocopied ;-) But it has always answered all the code questions, makes suggestions on (legal) short cuts and has other hints and tricks. Even a bit of humor. _Very_ well written for the beginner.
If the person needs basic skill or design handholding, they need one of the pretty books. [The Reader's Digest DIY book is my favorite]
You can also recommend the Electrical Wiring FAQ, noting the caveat that it is somewhat out of date.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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Chris Lewis wrote:

In Canada can code modifications only be made at the province level (not city)? That would make life easier.
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In Canada, code modifications at lower than the provincial level are generally provided as "conditions" on your electrical wiring permit. Or ask the local permit office. There's very few of them.
The only one I've seen is the condition in our local permits saying "you can't use aluminum wire". (It's still code-legal. Some municipalities have chosen to prohibit it for branch circuits. Mine has, but still allows it for subpanel feeds)
--
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On Apr 19, 2:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:
...

...
[...snip very nice discussion of sources for (primarily) CN participants...]...
That's the thing which I figured was probably the "gotcha" over what I lot of homeowners see/do in attics that I figured Dom probably wasn't thinking about as a limitation/problem...even though the space isn't used on a daily basis, there are still requirements on what can/can't be done and a good source is good.
I suppose the problem in the w/ the similar type thing is the proliferation of level of code acceptance/modification by jurisdiction makes such an endeavor prohibitively expensive to maintain for the size of market. Probably something to do with how NEC holds licensing and copyright rules as well... :) Sounds like it would be the ticket, though.
I'm lucky in that live in a rural area not subject to local code/ inspection so I use what level of compliance I'm comfortable with -- which is about to the mid-1980's or so... :) Seemed to me to work adequately then and I see little of real significance for the average application in the more recent changes. I do/would check for "what's new" in cases of any large new or out-of-the-ordinary installation, though.
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CN is in Asia. I have no idea what their codes are like (if they in fact have _any_) We're CA ;-)

Right.

There's a couple of factors that makes Knight's books feasible, despite the smaller market:
a) There's at most 9 markets, not 50 [It would be 10, but DIY electrical is illegal in Quebec]
As it turns out, there are three versions: Ontario (CEC + amendments), BC (CEC + amendments), and the "Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland" "pure CEC, no mods" version..
Aha, Dom's right, I see the BC and Ontario 2007-2010 versions aren't out yet. Ontario one is due May 10th, BC date isn't firmed up yet. This will make about the fifth one I've bought.
If Dom is in Ontario or BC, he should wait a bit if he can, tho, for this job it probably won't make any difference.
b) Electrical codes (CEC, and CSA inspection standards) as amended for the province + inspection rules are force of law in _all_ provinces. You can theoretically go to jail for a code violation. Truly local variation tends to be quite minor.
c) The books are _cheap_ and easy to update. The MSRP for Knight is only $13.95 CDN. The US ones are at least double that in US dollars.
d) the CEC is written a little more simply/clearly than the NEC from what I've been able to make out ;-)
There are likely some analogous books in the US, but they're not nation-wide, and aimed more at tradesmen (eg: CodeCheck or Mike Holt's http://www.mikeholt.com ) than DIYers.
Compare http://www.mikeholt.com to http://www.psknight.com in terms of cost of production of the web site.
--
Chris Lewis,

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Thanks for your help. I have a clear vision how to do this now. I have also invested in some books.
Dom
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