replacing a thermost without ability to turn off electricity

Page 2 of 2  


No, only 120. You need only to break one leg of the circuit to stop the heater from being "on".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah yeah, but, the other wire connecting to the T-stat is 120V the other direction...
Hint: if you remove the thermostat on a 240V heater without killing the breaker, there's 240V between the two wires that _used_ to connect to the T-stat.[+]
You get your choice - touch a ground and either lead, you get a 120V shock. Touch both leads and you get a 240V shock.
[+] Or indeed any switch in a 240V circuit.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 26 Sep 2007 14:48:45 GMT, Bennett Price

I should have thought about that. Do they make programmable thermostats for such systems?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Many of those are battery-powered devices that fit _over_ the T-stat and mechanically move the knob with a small motor. Particularly common for round-type T-stats.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Lewis wrote:

Back in the halycyon days of my yoot I jury rigged "nite setback" on my apartment's heating system thermostat by using one of those little plug-in 24 hour timers, an extension cord and a 6 watt incandescent night light.
I hung the night light on the wall below the thermostat and adjusted the distance between them so that when the bulb lit during sleeping hours it tricked the thermostat into dropping the room temperature about 10 degrees. (Same as making the mistake of putting one of the big old vacuum tube TVs against a wall under the thermostat.)
It wasn't an original idea BTW, there may even have been some commercially available gadgets back then which did the same thing. And, in the September 2005 issue of "MAKE" magazine a similar suggestion was made, but eliminated the timer I used by a photocell controlled night light, so a setback occurred when the room got dark. Described thusly:
"Make a Thermostat Fooler to update your old home thermostat rather than buying a programmable one for over $100. Spend $3 for an incandescent night light and hang it on a string under your thermostat. At night, heat from the light makes the thermostat think the house is warmer than it really is. When daylight comes the light goes off and the temperature controller goes back to normal operation."
Thanks for the mammaries,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

THEY don't but I do. It requires relays.
Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trainfan1 wrote:

Actually, THEY do. For example:
http://www.honeywell-thermostat.com/t-lineprogrammable.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't just assume there is universal interchangeability between thermostats, particularly ones which as you indicate are controlling both heating AND air conditioning.
If I was your landlord I certainly wouldn't appreciate your screwing around with parts of the most expensive appliance I there without my knowledge and permission.
Is there some particular reason (other than your being cheap.) that you don't want to involve the landlord?
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
me thinks , he thinks that he gonna save some money , until he burns something up , cuz he apparently has no clue whats he's doing
then he'll be wondering about the economy of diy !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 26, 5:35 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

People replying here are making a lot of assumptions about what and how that thermostat controls your heating and AC. Also your questions indicates very little, if any, knowledge of electricity. Do you even have or know how to use a test voltmeter? There have been enough horror stories about people trying to hook up low voltage programmable thermostats directly to 230 volt lines; they burn up and are not returnable! Also line voltage thermostats to low voltage control circuits, they usually don't work! Had a son in law who tried that! he also manged to burn out the motor on his aire xchanger; some people and electrcity don't mix. If something doesn't work or burns out, even if thermostat seems to work OK during cooling but does not during heating season an expert will have to be called in anyway. Please make sure you know what you are doing, also safety!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's not for you to decide.

Talk to your landlord.

--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.