Replacing a cracked sliding window ??

Hi,
A window in my office cracked and I want to replace it. How is this typical ly handled? I'd like to do it myself rather then have someone in. Typically , is there a way to get the glass+frame out of the track? If so, do I then just take it to a glass shop? OR does the glass+frame stay in the track, an d somehow the broken glass comes out and new glass goes it?
See pics: http://tinypic.com/r/262ma6o/8
I googled the name in the pic but found nothing.
Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

A little hard to tell, but that looks like a double pane window. If so, lots of them come with lifetime guarantees. Examine all around the window looking for a sticker or other identification and contact the manufacturer.
Happened to me. Got the replacements for free. The company did want to charge for service, but I picked up the window and did it myself. Besides the large cut I got, it was pretty easy.
--
Dan Espen

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Strang,
Not enough information. How about a couple of pictures indoors with the window closed and with the window open and then from the outside, open and closed. Googling does get much for W A Therm.Do you own the building in which your office is located?
Dave M.
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As others have said, it's hard to tell from the picture exactly what you have, but I'll toss this out anyway. (I can't even tell if those are metal or vinyl windows.)
Anyway, most sliders can be removed by lifting the sash up and swinging the bottom out.
Look on the upper track and see if you see a "clip" of some type that can be removed, revealing a gap in the upper channel. If you see that, removed the clip, perhaps by pulling it straight down (that's how mine works). Once the gap is revealed, you slide the window until the upper corner is under the gap and then lift the window up.
In other cases there is a block in the upper track and you have to open the window far enough to clear the block in order to lift it up high enough to get the bottom of the window out of the track.
Google some youtube videos for removing sliding windows and you'll see different techniques.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com;3257331 Wrote:

Strangeways:
Probably the most cost efficient way of getting this window fixed is to take it out yourself and take it to a glass repair shop for them to do the work. Then, you put the glass back in. But, I'd phone around because my experience with glass repair shops is that the cost estimates you get from different glass repair shops will vary wildly.
Your pictures don't show any detail because everything is dark. Wait until evening and take pictures then so that the flash on your camera fires, and you see more detail in the picture. Take pictures of the inside corners of the window because if that's where you'll be able to see if there are stops holding the window in place. The way to tell if there are stops holding the window in is to look for a seam between the window frame and stop, and these will be most evident at the corners on the inside of the window. If the seams are arranged in such a way that it looks like there are pieces that come out in order to remove the glass, then those pieces that come out are stops and you need to remove those to get the glass out. The seam may be very thin and you might think the stop doesn't come out, but it does. The key is to look on the corners of the window on the inside to see if there are stops holding the glass in or not.
The glass in your window looks like a double glazed sealed unit. It will be more expensive to repair than if it were a single glazed sliding window. That's because double glazed sealed units require two panes of glass and both are bonded to a spacer unit between the panes. Look on the spacer unit between the panes for a sticker of some type or other identification as to who made that sealed unit. There will be places in every city that make up double glazed sealed units. You'll find that some places will be significantly more expensive than others, and that's often because the expensive places send their work to the cheap places to be done, and make a profit on their merely sending the window out to be repaired.
Your best bet is to take several pictures of your window, and take them down to any glass repair shop and they will tell you how to get the broken sealed unit out. I can't see it in your picture, but normally sealed units like that are held in with metal stops that run all around the window on the inside only.
You use a bee keeper's bar to pry those metal stops out.
http://tinyurl.com/mubm2xr
The A. Richard company calls this bar a "lever bar scraper", and these kinds of bars are about the only pry bars with an edge sharp enough to fit between the stop and the window frame. You can buy them at most hardware stores. Lots of companies besides A. Richard make them. Just print off that picture and take it with you and you should find some place that sells them. But wait to check with a window repair shop in your are to make sure you need one of these to remove the stops to get the glass out.
Normally, to remove the stops, you put the sharp edge of the pry bar into the seam under the window stop, bump it with the heel of your hand in an upward direction and the stop should pop out of the frame. You take all four stops out from around the glass, and then you might need a suction cup to pull the sealed unit out of the frame. Once you get the glass out, it'd be a good idea to use a damp sponge to clean the rubber lip on the outside of the window that keep rain from getting into the window frame.
--
nestork

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On Tue, 8 Jul 2014 14:32:22 -0400, "David Martel"

LIke most OP's, he's disappeared, but....

Outside pictures hard to do, I think. It looks like the 5th floor.

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