Replacing a Circuit Board on Bryant 395BAW on my own


So I have been having trouble with my Bryant furnace (model 395BAW). It seems pretty old but I don't know how old. A couple years ago I believe the circuit board was replaced because we were getting air flow through the blower and the pilot was lighting, but no heat. Burners would fire intermittently and then less and less often.
The problem is occurring again. Instead of bringing someone in I want to do it myself. I found the part online and am thinking to order it (apparently it's not really something that can be picked up at a store). Can anyone offer any advice on installing the part? How-to websites or other insight? Or other solutions to the problem?
Thanks SZ
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On Apr 19, 11:58 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you get the part from arnoldservice.com they can likely offer instructins as well. Try repairclinic.com, too. Installtion ought to be quire easy. Good luck.
Joe
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http://arnoldservice.com/Troubleshooting_Heating_Problems.htm
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On Apr 19, 12:58 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

sounds like it could be a thermal couple going bad or the pilot flame not flowing over it.
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On Apr 19, 11:58 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I recently also had some problems with my American Standard unit. Was told the main logic board was bad. They wanted $500.00 for the board.
Looked at it myself. Cold solder joint where the 12/5 volt makes the connection. At least I think it was the 12/5 volt connector. It was a real easy fix with a soldering iron.
It's worth checking. Solid state components don't go bad very often.
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Thanks everybody for your replies. I wasn't brave enough to replace the circuit board on my own and my neighbor was able refer a reliable serviceman. He did some tests. Namely, he took out the high-limit sensor and used a wire to bypass it. It turned out that was the problem. The faceplate on the sensor was a slightly warped so it was bent to the side and touching the side of the heat exchanger (or at least too close to it), and thereby continually triggering the sensor.
The repair guy just re-installed the same high-limit sensor but without screwing it in so tightly, and so it wouldn't be . This was a temporary fix until I can order a new sensor and replace it. (I'm not sure if I explained this exactly correct, but it's fixed and I'm happy.) Thanks again everyone!
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