replacement wire size

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When replacing the wiring for a stove what size wire should be used? I am replacing 3 wires with 4 wire.
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On 6/21/2014 3:44 PM, kathleen ellis wrote:

Are you changing the stove/range as well? If so, size it based on what it needs.
The wire sizing isn't based on the number of conductors so use the same as is there if the requirements haven't changed.
In general rule of thumb, the range will be on a 50A breaker and 8 ga copper wire.
So the real answer is "we don't know" w/o additional information on the range and breaker/fuse on the circuit.
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On Saturday, June 21, 2014 5:16:02 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

+1
The wire size and breaker are determined by the appliance. You seldom replace or change the wiring without replacing the appliance, so this is a bit strange. The appliance install instructions should say what to use.
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On 6/21/2014 4:44 PM, kathleen ellis wrote:

Same size you have.
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On Sat, 21 Jun 2014 20:44:01 +0000, kathleen ellis

#6. It will be 6-3 with ground. (red/white/black plus green or bare)What you have now will most likely be 6-2 with ground (black and white plus bare ground)
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kathleen ellis wrote:

If it is brand new stove, there it should be mentioned in the manual. 4 wires what I'd get with proper wire gauge. It will meet code for sure.
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On 6/21/2014 7:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

By NEC except for the lowest-possible rated temperature rating cable made (which I'm not sure is even available any more) #8 is adequate for 50 A by my copy of the Tables. I don't recall ever seeing #6 just for a range altho I suppose some of the newer double ovens and all the bells and whistles might have >50 A demands...
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Doesn't it also depend on the length of the run?
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On 6/23/2014 3:08 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

1. Determine the load in amps. 2. Select a cable to handle the amps. 3. Select a breaker to limit amperage and protect the cable. 4. Up-size the cable if the permissible voltage drop would be exceeded.
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On Monday, June 23, 2014 8:55:13 PM UTC-4, Jack wrote:

You mean you want to do it the right way?
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If it is a double oven stove or a stove with a warming drawer you need number 6 copper wire.
If it is a basic stove you can get by with #8 copper.
The best thing is to check the stove installation instructions or the nameplate.

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On Thu, 26 Jun 2014 09:54:26 -0700 (PDT), John G

recommended to put the #6 cable in when replacing old cable to upgrade to "current code". It would be a pitty to have to do the job all over again next time you buy a new stove just because you "cheaped out" this time
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Everyone is assuming the OP needs to run a new circuit to the stove location.
It is also possible it is just a new cord and plug on the stove, in which case the answer is going to be different.
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wrote:

"4 wire circuit" for the stove. to replace the "3 wire circuit" that was currently installed.
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On 6/28/2014 9:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

appliances have the 4 wire, but I think it is still code to adapt them to existing 3 wire systems. You need a new cord to do so.
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On Saturday, June 28, 2014 10:34:33 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

It's iffy. If the appliance has a plug on it and has instructions for wiri ng it to a 3 wire outlet then you may do that. If the appliance hardwires in then no.
Probably got a stove that has 110v circuit in it as well as 220. Some newe r stoves with electronics often do that. Not sure why since they could jus t as easily have their switching power supply for the electronics work on 2 20. In any case they probably need a 4 wire circuit and I'd go with #6 jus t so I never had to mess with it again.
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On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 9:32:48 AM UTC-4, jamesgang wrote:

s in then no.

NEw ovens typically have installation intructions for hard wiring it in to either a 3 wire or 4 wire installation. Every install manual I've seen covers wiring it in direct to 3 wire, if that's what's there. Given that the installation instructions specifically cover it, AFAIK, it's code compl iant and you're not required to run new wiring back to the panel.

ust as easily have their switching power supply for the electronics work on 220. In any case they probably need a 4 wire circuit and I'd go with #6 j ust so I never had to mess with it again.
Stoves have had 120V available on a 3 wire cord for 50+ years. You have the two hots, the third wire serves as both the neutral and the ground. It's permitted to carry current, that gives you 120V. And it's very common for stoves to have lights, receptacles to plug a coffe pot in, etc that are 120V. Stoves back in the 50s had them.
What's different with 4 wires is that adds a separate dedicated ground, which doesn't carry current, instead of sharing the neutral as the ground, as is done with 3 wires.
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On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 10:20:06 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

res in then no.

just as easily have their switching power supply for the electronics work on 220. In any case they probably need a 4 wire circuit and I'd go with #6 just so I never had to mess with it again.

Some inspectors will consider a hardwired appliance a change to the wiring and require you to upgrade to code. Not all but some.
Sure, they ran the analog clocks on 110 you used to see in the middle of th em.
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On Tuesday, July 1, 2014 10:49:12 AM UTC-4, jamesgang wrote:

m>

wires in then no.

ld just as easily have their switching power supply for the electronics wor k on 220. In any case they probably need a 4 wire circuit and I'd go with #6 just so I never had to mess with it again.

Maybe some inspector, somewhere will, but it's obviously the exception, otherwise all the manufacturers of ovens and stoves would not include instructions on how to wire the appliance into either 3 wire or 4 wire. If it was a code violation or not acceptable to most inspectors, it would be totally irresponsible.
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