Replacement Window Question ?


Hello:
Have been getting contradictory opinions from contractors, so thought I'd ask here.
Need several new windows on a house that has the typical horizontal clapboards.
Can a "New Contruction Type" of window be installed without ripping away (any) of the clapboards ? If so, how is this managed.
I understand that there is no problem with "Replacement Types" of windows in this regard, but I like the fact that with a New Construction Type, the existing Sill would also be replaced, as the present ones are a bit rotted.
Might as well also ask: any opinions on the pros and cons of each approach, such as cost, etc. ? Thinking of the Andersen brand for either.
Thanks, B.
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I just noted in Andersen's instructions for my new slider that the weather flange that makes it a "new construction" window can be slided off with a utility knife, making it into a "replacement" window.
Robert11 wrote:

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do you have trim on the outside of your windows? if you do, it can be removed, and the new construction windows can be installed, with new custom cut trim fitted around the window. or if you don't have outside trim, if the new window is a bit smaller, trim can be added.
it's true the fin can be cut off, but would do that as a last resort as the fin should be flashed into the building paper so that water can't penetrate the system.
Stubby wrote:

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clapboards by the width of new molding he would apply later. That revealed the old flanges, and left room for the new flanges. After installing the windows, he covered the exposed area with a sticky sheet rubber, and then installed molding, and then caulked. It looks great and has not leaked at all.
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Your contractor was a pro and cutting corners. Lucky You.

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That is not what I meant to say. I even checked my out box to make sure that is what I really sent!
I meant to say, Your contactor was a pro AND not cutting corners.
Gosh what a difference one word can make in a statement.
You got a first class job IMO and others who follow this thread should use it as a guideline for how it should be done.
Colbyt
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Robert11 wrote: ...

"Can" is pretty open-ended... :) "How" is the rub, and cost is directly correlated.
It's primarily a case of how much effort an installer is willing to go to to do a retrofit. In almost any case, w/ enough time and care, a new construction window could be worked into place by a combination of lifting siding and cutting fasteners, etc. The difference is that most installers don't have the patience and most homeowners don't want to spend the money for the time required to do so.
The advantage of a new construction is essentially the integral flange although w/ care a replacement can be sealed weathertight as well. In some cases, the original look may be of sufficient value to be worth the effort (as in historic preservation) but in general that isn't such an issue.
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I just finished installing 2 new construction Pella Windows, 41" x 53" double hungs. The old sills were in bad shape. I used a small battery circular saw to cut back the siding and I made new trim out of pine to fit.
Pella sells a great "flashing tape". A sticky. rubbery tape that went over the flange that you screw through to hold the window in place.
I also used the expanding foam to seal the inside voids around the window. This worked great. Made for windows and doors so as not to expand to much and warp the windows.
I just finished the last coat of poly on the inside trim...
Steve

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The routine with rotted sills seems to be to stabilize the rot and then wrap the sill with coil stock before installing the replacement window. You could also fabricate and install new sills without disturbing the siding.
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I would download and carefully study the Andersen installation instructions. Without good flashing, new windows are a waste. Siding has to be removed to install the flashing.

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