Replacement screws for a GE panel

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One of the screws for my GE panel cover is stripped out. Are those screws available, can I just use any old screw as a replacement - so long as it fits of course?
I don't have the model for my panel unfortunately, it isn't clearly marked - TRP1210? it takes TQL breakers.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Sounds like you are talking aout electrical panel? You can use any screw for sure.
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Yup, it's my main panel. For some reason I was expecting to have to replace the screws with some odd, off-the wall screw that met stringent UL requirements or some damn thing.
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replying to Tony Hwang, Sportsdad7 wrote: NO, you can't just use any screw. They MUST be blunt tip. No point is allowed.
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On 9/2/2016 6:44 AM, Sportsdad7 wrote:

Better late than never. You're responding to a TEN YEAR OLD POST! (that was already answered)
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On Friday, September 2, 2016 at 9:59:31 AM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Although, to his credit, he is the only one that mentioned "blunt tip".
Everybody else just basically said "any screw will do".
Here's a good reason why "any screw will *not* do":
http://inspectapedia.com/electric/ElecHaz206-DFs.jpg
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On Friday, September 2, 2016 at 10:57:35 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Although I understand the reason for safety and codes, most screws (on home breakerboxes) are in the corners. And wires don't easily make right-angle bends. Just my perception on it.
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Fri, 02 Sep 2016 17:34:31 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

No, but, sometimes a lazy electrician/wannabe and/or home owner who doesn't care about the pleasant looking panel aspects might leave wires chilling a bit too far towards the sides. Some might say parts of the code is all about keeping stupid from being dead.
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On Friday, September 2, 2016 at 9:47:15 PM UTC-5, Diesel wrote:

A pointless comment...seriously?
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On Fri, 2 Sep 2016 20:15:25 -0700 (PDT), bob_villa

And others might say the "code" is mostly about putting $$$ in the pockets of electricians.
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wrote:

install things to code. When they don't allow you to do anything to your own electrical system, THAT is just to line electricians pockets
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I'm not so sure about putting money in electricians pockets in so much as keeping themselves in a job and better the pockets of the electrical industry. The electricians themselves are the low person on the totem pole. GE, Fluke, IDEAL, etc, make tons more when the code changes requiring this or that type of breaker, etc. We have to have arc fault breakers in bedrooms now because many fires start in the bedroom (which doesn't automatically mean the fire was electrical in nature or that an arc fault could have prevented it if it was).
A few years ago, when we first started installing these damn things inside the panel, they were very sensitive and an treadmill, etc, could cause them to trip. That forced the home owner to buy an additional surge suppression strip that might (didn't help in one or two cases) prevent the breaker from tripping when they turn on their vacuum and/or the treadmill or some other piece of exercise equipment. The sensitivity issue has been cleared up somewhat, but, you're still talking about a breaker thats $30 or more vs a standard breaker that's around $3 or so.
Another code change is the way the receptacle is supposed to face you. Ground pin up now. The reason being I was told.. In case someone has metal things hanging from the wall, if one should happen to come loose and side down the wall between the plug and the outlet,it'll hit the ground pin and most likely, neutral; no short circuit condition. And, if it does hit the hot wire, it's going to send it right to ground. This all assumes two things: Someone has something plugged into the outlet and they have a metal poster of some kind also hanging on the wall above this same outlet.
Okay.. so, when was the last time you've seen someone who had a street sign or something mounted to their wall like a poster? What's the chances should someone have one, that it would actually stay towards the wall while it slides all the way down the wall to get between the plug of something and the outlet?
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Diesel has brought this to us :

Could also be a metal wire for hanging a picture on the wall.
Some newer plugs and outlets are designed with skirts and accomodating recesses to make this problem moot.
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On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 16:38:13 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

position of receptacles in past or present code. HOWEVER - the design of the current receptacles with the ground screw location makes it sensible to install with the "U" ground down If a ground were to somehow come loose, gravity would not cause it to possibly sag onto the live conductor. Not likely, you say?? Perhaps you are right, but no mopre unlikely than a traffic sign being hung above and sliding down - getting between the plug and receptacle, and shorting across the blades of the plug.. And read the lettering cast into the plasticfront and back. The "strip gauge" lettering on the back is right side up with the "U" ground down - as is the "15 amp" 125 volt" and "U/L" logo on the front. The UL listing number on the "top" tab is also oriented to be right side up with the ground down.
The manufacturer's name (in my case Leviton) on the newest product is upside down when installed ground down - on some older units even that was oriented to be read clearly with the ground dowm.

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca Sun, 04 Sep 2016 02:06:50 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

I believe it's a local "code" that's being enforced by some? of the inspectors around here. It seems to be inconsistent and I couldn't find anything specifically from NEC discussing it. I don't bring that upto the inspectors though. It's like wrestling with a pig in the mud...Sooner or later, you'll realize, the pig is enjoying it.

I personally don't disagree with you.
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Sun, 04 Sep 2016 06:34:15 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

I should have been more clear previously. This appears to be a 'local code' that's being semi enforced by some inspectors in this area. I didn't find anything in the NEC that actually addresses it.
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Do you find yourself arguing with inspectors often? I wonder if I've had the pleasure of working with people of your mindset before. If so, you're the type of person who pisses that inspector off and makes more, unnecessary (imho) work for us.
We have several inspectors in this area insisting (a polite way to put it) that we install them ground pin up due to some local code (that nobody can quote me) they are enforcing. As they have the final say over the inspection, Myself and the rest of the crew tend to do what they want us to do. We're just the electricians, not that high up the totem pole.
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On Monday, September 5, 2016 at 3:31:31 PM UTC-4, Diesel wrote:

Woah there pilgrim! You posted this:
"Another code change is the way the receptacle is supposed to face you. Ground pin up now. The reason being I was told.. In case someone has metal things hanging from the wall, if one should happen to come loose and side down the wall between the plug and the outlet,it'll hit the ground pin and most likely, neutral; no short circuit condition."
In AHR when people say there has been an electrical "code change", it implies that it's an NEC change. You must have meant that too, otherwise it's pretty much pointless to just tell everyone here that there has been a code change if that code change has only made in your little burg somewhere and you don't even say where that is. What relevance does it have to the rest of us if it's not a new NEC code most places then adopt?

So now apparently it's not even all the inspectors in your area, but just some. They can't be much of an inspector if they can't site the code that they are enforcing.

That's fine. But I would think you'd realize that there is a difference between some local inspectors enforcing something that they can't even site and a NEC code change that effects much of the whole country. And I'd hope you wouldn't go around posting about a "code change", when you now say that so far even the inspectors making you put outlets in ground pin up, can't site the code behind it.
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On Monday, September 5, 2016 at 3:55:41 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

You enjoy chastising...but clearly don't know how inspectors work, right or wrong. We had a state inspector/engineer who said we had to remove a block wall that supported an over-hang at a back entrance. Fire Code says the ro of has to be 4 ft or more to require sprinkler coverage...this was 3 ft. My regional maintenance supervisor did not want to fight it! We contracted to have a tubular pillar put in. That engineer became the chief engineer for the state! (Yes, I know this is fire code and not electrical code)
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On Monday, September 5, 2016 at 6:31:28 PM UTC-4, bob_villa wrote:

ck wall that supported an over-hang at a back entrance. Fire Code says the roof has to be 4 ft or more to require sprinkler coverage...this was 3 ft. My regional maintenance supervisor did not want to fight it! We contracted to have a tubular pillar put in. That engineer became the chief engineer fo r the state! (Yes, I know this is fire code and not electrical code)
As usual, you chime in and don't know WTF you're talking about. I never said or implied anything about how inspectors work or don't work. I didn't tell Diesel to argue with the inspector. My point was that when you make a post that the "code" has been changed so that it now requires receptacles be installed ground pin up, and you don't make any reference to a location or local code, it implies that the NEC has been changed. It's like people posting here that the code now requires AFCI in most of the living space. That's true, because the NEC has been changed. In the case of the ground pin up, from what Diesel is now saying this is something that some of the local inspectors he deals with are requiring, but they can't cite any code to back it up. According to you I should have just shut up so that people reading it think that this is "code" like AFCIs, etc and that it probably applies to them, when so far no one can even cite the code? And I'm about 99.9% sure it's not in NEC. If this were an NEC thing, widely adopted, it would be all over the internet. It's not.
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