Replacement of Pyramid Skylight

Hi, we are looking to replace our pyramid skylight, what should I be looking for in terms of quality build that will last?
Something made of galvanized steel, aluminum, PVC?
What is the big difference between the bubble type skylights and the pyramid ones? I've had a few quotes so far and they are pushing the bubbles.
Here's a picture of the current skylight.
We live in Montreal so something very weatherproof for the cold is also key.
Thanks click to open the full size version of the image
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On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 8:44:08 PM UTC-4, MTL514 wrote:

IDK, but looking at it, the pyramid one sure has a lot more seams all over the place. The common type only has seams around the perimeter where the glass meets the frame. More seems, more places to leak eventually. By far the preferred name in skylights is Velux, only ones I'd use.
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That looks like a very old style skylight. Maybe you could carefully rebuild? Otherwise, the modern pyramide styles are one piece, no seams. I think the frames are the same and the difference is mainly price or looks. My skylight is a design feature which sits at visible peak of a fully gambled roof. A bubble design would look odd as the pyramide continues the roof angles. Your application is not visible so price probably is the determinative consideration unless you feel that the view from below would differ significantly.
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 25 Sep 2015 16:51:31 -1000, "John Keiser"

What about satellite pictures?

It would be a lot better for me if the OP and others would separate the [IMG] from the url with a space or more, same for the [ ] at the end.
Would this inconvenience anyone else?

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wrote:

That skylight is also venting your roof. You can't replace it with a sealed skylight, unless adding venting elsewhere. I added two vents. I then bought a larger skylight that extended to the roof joists and boxed it in. I left the opening in the plaster ceiling the same size. Having the larger skylight above the opening allows light from more angles to make it through the ceiling opening. I then lined the sides between the roof and the ceiling with aluminum foil. Stuck on with two-sided tape. Now also reflected light makes it in.
I did not want a plastic skylight. I wanted double glass. I put in an Insula-Dome. They are now out of business. My roofer now recommends using http://supremeskylights.com/
But this is a local company to me. You will have to find someone is Canada.
The skylight itself is a single large pane of doubled glass. My flat roof has a slight slope. The skylight was made with a little more slope.
Over the opening in the plaster ceiling is a panel of stained glass. The original one -- not leaded glass -- got burned up when I sent it out to have the paint stripped off. I found a leaded one I liked in an antique shop. I took a picture. My local stained glass store then made one that fit the opening exactly. I selected very pale color glass to let the maximum light through.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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I would go for any skylight that did not have any seams to leak air or water.
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