Replace water line from street to house -- PEX or copper?

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Um...your mind is wrong.
Read what you posted. You didn't use PEX, you used PEX-AL-PEX or AluPEX, or PEX/Aluminum/PEX which is made of a layer of aluminum sandwiched between two layers of PEX.
Calling that PEX is like calling a grilled cheesed sandwich "bread".
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's what I bought at Home Despot - and they were calling it pex. At the time, I think that's the only form of pex they were selling for residential / do-it-yourself plumbing.
And if you ask me, I would never buy just the plastic tubing (the so-called "real" pex) for any plumbing projects, given that the "AluPex" is available and is a whole lot stronger given the aluminum layer.
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I call BS.

I won't ask you.
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Home!Guy;3219784 Wrote: >

> "AluPex"

Even if "just the plastic tubing" is plenty strong enough?
At some point, additional strength is no longer a benefit.
Do we attach our postage stamps with epoxy glue so the stamp doesn't come off the envelope? Do we tie our shoe laces with triple box knots so they don't untie on their own? Do you have a solid steel bumper on your car because it's stronger or a plastic one because it's cheaper and lighter in weight?
If the plastic tubing is strong enough to last decades with double or even triple the pressure it's likely to see in service, then putting an aluminum layer inside it does nothing more than make it more expensive to make and more expensive to buy.
--
nestork


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Run the PEX inside schedule 40 pvc sewer pipe. that way if it ever needs replaced just dig at either end and snake the new line by attaching pulling to the old line.
the work and costs are in the digging this elminates most digging if it ever fails, and provides mechanical protection for the pex......
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On Mon, 07 Apr 2014 16:49:35 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Buried 5' !!! Yow! I live in North Alabama, and our frost line is about 14 inches deep; although after this winter that may get redefined.
Any indication of what causes the black poly to fail so often. I've never heard of it failing except at a connection, and that is usually due to settling.
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On 04/08/14 09:13 am, CRNG wrote:

5ft. deep at the township's shutoff. Maybe about 3ft. deep where it enters the basement. This is in W. Michigan.
Perce
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The wall thinning is usually due to acidic water in the pipes or in the surrounding soil.
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On 4/8/2014 9:13 AM, CRNG wrote:

The municipal water supply is slightly base here but the surrounding soil is slightly acidic clay. I have the feeling that any sort of reactive material is not the way to go for direct burial, thus the preference for PEX for modern installs (except where set-in-stone code requirements still prevail). At least K-type direct-burial pipe comes with plastic anti-corrosion coating now which should help.
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On Tue, 8 Apr 2014 05:38:50 +0200, nestork

Aluplex can make a much neater install, as you can form bends down to 2 pipe diameters radius, and it holds it's shape, unlike plain PEX. It also uses pressfit fittings which do not require specialized tools, it has a 50 year projected lifespan (compared to 20 for PEX) and it is totally oxygen impervious -
For some people, and some installations, this makes AluPEX a worthwhile upgrade over standard PEX.
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run PEX in PVC conduit, for mechanical protection and easy replacement if it ever fails in the future, just dig up each end and install new line of your preference.
the black poly does get brittle with age, but it takes a long time
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to save $$$ on this project try finding a local guy with a backhoe to dig the trench. a large part of a plumbers mark up is the excavating.......
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On 04/09/14 08:11 am, bob haller wrote:

I was surprised to find that they are not digging a trench, just digging a hole at each end and using a "missile" (as he put it). Even for copper it would still be the same method. I don't know whether that would work for PVC.
Just talked to a neighbor who's live here a lot longer than we have; he said that a lot of the people around here have had to have their original poly piping replaced. The development is about 45 years old.
The water pressure must have something to do with the failure rate too. Our supply is approx. 80psi, but we installed a pressure reducer in the house to take it down to about 45psi.
Perce
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On 04/09/14 08:48 am, I wrote:

Now I've watched the procedure in action, I wouldn't have called it a "missile": it's a compressed-air-powered procedure: pulsating compressed air forces the "head" through the soil bit by bit until it emerges the other end, then they attach the PEX or copper to the end of the air hose and pull it through.
To use PVC as "conduit" would require digging a trench, they told me. And that would require hand digging around a bunch of other cables and the gas line.
I was surprised to see how shallow the cable company's cable is buried. I could easily have damaged it when working on the sprinkler system if I'd had to do anything at that spot.
Perce
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On Wednesday, April 9, 2014 10:44:44 AM UTC-4, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I've seen that used here to go under driveways, sidewalks, etc. And for those applications, it's even better because more work would be involved. Seems to go pretty fast, but I guess a lot depends on the soil.

Cable company lines here are only a few inches deep in spots too. They use a machine to actually pull them, no trenching involved. They do that for lawn sprinkler poly pipe too. The downside is that at best, it's not very deep and if the soil is really hard in spots the eqpt tends to ride up, so it can wind up only a couple inches underground.
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On Wed, 09 Apr 2014 10:44:44 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

I've had the cable damaged by a turf aerator (plugger) more than once. The cable is just BARELY under the sod.
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That's how they ran the plastic gas mains and service lines to our houses last fall. Holes on both sides of driveways, holes at the street and at various places in yards, holes at the houses, but not a lot of actual trenches.
The few places where they dug trenches was where they had to follow a curve.

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gas company replaced a lot of main lines in our neighborhood.
They snaked a new plastic line thru the old metal mains. Just one hole dug at each homesstreet shut off....
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