Replace Popcorn Ceiling --> Best Replacement?

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Hello,
I have a popcorn ceiling that is in need of replacement. Here it is 2007 and I'm wondering what is the most popular ceiling option these days? I keep hearing the terms "Skip Trowel", "Textured", and "Flat", but am not sure which of these options is the most "popular" these days. I'm planning on doing the work myself, so if possible, I would like an option that does not require a lot of experience, or expensive equipment to purchase. Are there any good Web Sites out there that can give you good "how to" information on this subject?
Thanks!
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Plain old smooth finish is never out of style, IMO. Just remove the popcorn and paint.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Agreed, except that underneath all that popcorn you'll usually find a half finished tape and mudding job. Plan on "finishing" that job before you paint. It doesn't require any special tools either.
--
Grandpa

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I'm told that a plain simple finish shows any imperfections. What tools and advice can you suggest regarding getting rid of all these imperfections? I'm thinking of a plain simple white finish, and maybe putting some crown molding around the edges. Sound good?
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Thin coat of plaster over the whole ceiling? this way there will be "natural imperfections" due to troweling the plaster on but it will look good.
nate
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On 2 Jan 2007 05:32:37 -0800, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

It's just a frikkin house. Who cares about a few imperfections. People used to live in caves and there were lots more imperfections in them. Your life will not end because you can see a few trowel marks on your ceiling. And who gives a fuck what is popular. People who need to follow fads and need others determine their lives are generally losers themselves. Do what appeals to you, or just move to a rental where your landlord is in charge of the home and you dont have to use your mind to make decisions.
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Advice? - You'll get what you pay for, so pay for a book: http://www.amazon.ca/Drywall-Pro-Tips-Hanging-Finishing/dp/1580112706 Personally, I like crown molding. Getting a smooth finish on the ceiling is not hard, its just time consuming and depends on how much of a perfectionist you want to be.
--
Grandpa

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Would your home design permit a "Spanish" stuccoed look? If done well, by a professional who understands not going overboard for the Spanish look -- or by your good self if you have studied up and done some practice stucco-ing on a throw-away surface -- this works beautifully to hide potential imperfections. I have that look on the ceilings of all my plastered OR wallpapered rooms.
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Beware that older homes can have traces of asbestos in the popcorn ceiling. I suggest getting it tested (most professionals will include this in the estimate, and might even be required by law). If you will be doing this yourself, make sure to wear a mask. It's probably a good idea to seal off the room with plastic sheets as you're in for a lovely mess.
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LISTEN PEOPLE!
Unless the popcorn has been painted, just wet it first, and IF there is any asbestos, it won't float around on the breeze. If it HAS been painted, just wear a good filter, and wet it when it hits the floor. Have fans running to suck air out of the room and blow it in at the same time.
One regular room does not require heroic steps or expensive testing. And the chances are that it doesn't have asbestos anyway.
The dust is the dangerous thing. Don't let it get dusty. Use either water or air flow.
And get it tested BEFORE you do the job if you're that afraid.
Steve
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If you take some basic precautions it can be done without contaminating your house. You should secure plastic over the floor and walls, making a plastic bowl of sorts. Isolate the room and use plenty of water. An asbestos abatment contractor would be the best choice, and may be the only legal choice depending where you live and if you are in a free-standing stucture or in a multi unit structure(condo/appartment).
http://asbestoscoconuts.blogspot.com /
If you look at the first picture on the above page you can see a portion of the plastic setup looks like for popcorn removal.
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It takes a lot more pounds of popcorn than you'd think. I once did a 12x15 ceiling and I think I had to pop about 15lbs of corn. Then, there's the caramel used to hold the popcorn on the ceiling. I think I used about 1.5to 2 lbs of caramel per square foot. They are quite costly ceilings. I perfer to just use paint these days and leave the flat ceiling. It's much cheaper and easier to do.
Bill
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Popcorn textured ceilings require very little skill to apply and have look passable which is why they are so common. The popcorn covers poorly taped drywall joints, thickness variations in the popcorn aren't very noticeable and a ceiling can be sprayed with popcorn in a few minutes. All other available ceiling finishes (excluding such things as pressed metal tiles) require significantly more skill and time to apply and have look good.
Pete C.
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Except patching up an existing popcorn ceiling and trying to make it match is still a challenge to me so I called in a pro and he said he couldn't make it match either. He wanted to do a complete spray job which cost just a little more than trying to match the existing so he wasn't looking for extra work.
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The "knockdown" (or skip trowel) seems to be what most people want now a days. See this site for excellent help.
http://www.drywallschool.com/knockdown.htm
--
Steve Barker

<samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
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I think it was samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca who stated:

I just dealt with that in a bathroom. What I did was to scrape off the popcorn with a wide putty knife, vacuuming the stuff up as I went. After two or three passes, I had a surface that looked mottled and pitted, but in a mostly uniform way all over the ceiling. I primed it and painted it and it looks MUCH better.
I have no idea if it would be "popular", nor do I care. *I* like the look of it; more importantly, SWMBO likes the look of it (it's HER bathroom, after all ;^) and what else matters unless we're going to be giving tours to the public?
It also required no "experience, or expensive equipment to purchase".
Enjoy . . . .
-- On the other hand, you have different fingers
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If your house is older than mid-70's, asbestos was sometimes a component of popcorn ceilings.
You might want to know for certain before you go scraping away at it.
ed
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So what? It is encapsulated and harmless. Reeder's Digest has a good article about asbestos fraud in the January issue.
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It is encapsulated and harmless until you go at it with a scraper. Then you are releasing asbestos fibers into the air and it is no longer harmless.
While I agree that the issue is often overblown and a whole industry has sprouted around "asbestos abatement" asbestos is a very real health concern and scraping away at a popcorn ceiling that contains it is not a good idea.
ed
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You dampen it first to make it easy to scrape. Nothing is flying around. My wife and I scraped about 1500 square feet of it.
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