Replace patio sliding doors

The sliding glass patio doors I have on my house are really showing their age - the inside of the two-panel glass doors somehow seems discolored, cracked, blistered, and just plain crappy. They also do not seal the air out very well, at least between the seam where the two doors meet.
I was think of trying to tackle this project myself.
The whole unit in the frame is 72" wide and 80 " in height. Is this one of the standard sizes that I might find at a Home Depot? I'd prefer not to have to fool around with framing the opening - if I did I'd probably just leave it for a contractor.
How hard of a project might this be - I am fairly good with most tools. Suggestions?
Thanks, Walleye
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Get a helper who is experienced, dont rush it , make it plumb , level and square. Most warrantys dont allow more than 1/8 out , to be voided
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You could do this yourself. That would be a standard size. Most sliders are knock down units that can be easily transported, assembled and installed by one person. It is important to make the sill area level before install. A common problem is how to deal with the exterior. New units have a nail flange style exterior. Your existing unit probably has wood brick mold. The best way to deal with this is install 5/4 wood over new flange and cover with aluminum. A harder problem is if your existing is a flange style with the siding installed over the flange. Then you need to cut back the siding, add J channel and then cover new flange as above. If you deal with Home Depot get the Anderson that American crapsman unit they sell isn't worth your effort.

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I did 3 of mine last year - very easy job.
The door is extremely heavy, remove the sliding door to ease handling. Make sure the slider is reattached and closed BEFORE nailing on the flange Fill the gaps with insulation or use the special low expanding foam for windows. The regular stuff expands too much and may crack the glass. Use plenty of caulking to seal the trim around the cutout for the flange. I was able to remove the siding, by pounding the nails thru with a punch, so I did not have to cutout for the flange on 2 of the doors.
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Don't you want a good door? I bought a Pella from a Pella dealer down the street from Home Depot. They are much better quality than the mass market models sold at the big box stores. More options of designs, etc.
I'd prefer not to

You need two people. In most cases, it is just taking one out, putting in the other. Some casing has to be removed from the old door and can probably be re-used with the new. You will have to shim the door to get it plumb and square. You want to be ready if there is any rot in the framing so you can replace it while the door is out.
It can be done. Figure the better part of a day wit two people. Probably a few hours if you have a friend that has done this before. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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While the "house brand" at HD is junk they do sell Anderson which is comparable with Pella. Actually I think it is better than Pella especially in the slider. For some reason Pella puts the operating panel outside and the screen inside. First ice storm ,on the exterior track, and you don't get out. In the summer you want to close up the house you have to open the screen, letting in all the bugs climbing on it, to close the slider.
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