Replace oil heating but keep boiler


-------------------------------------
Hi there,
I own a duplex that has hydronic heating with an oil-fired boiler. The problem is that there is a single oil tank for the whole duplex, and as the owner (living in the lower duplex) I have no control over how much tenants (living in the upper duplex) consume in terms of heating. The boiler is relatively new and I would hate to have to replace it, but I am looking for a way to separate the heating either switching to gas or electric, so that each living unit is independent. Does anyone know if this can be done without replacing the boiler?
Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks.
##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.home.repair - 358118 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 9, 6:20 pm, igal.corcos_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (lakeshow) wrote:

A few Danfoss TRVs might do it.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, I'll bite - How does adding t-stats to each radiator or baseboard separate the billing for the heat between the two units?
For the OP, here are some options -
1) Add a 2nd boiler, gas or oil, and separate the plumbing from the baseboard or radiators, probably easiest with PEX.
2) Disconnect the baseboards or radiators in the tenant's unit and replace them with electric baseboards. This will probably cost more to operate.
3) Disconnect the baseboards or radiators and have a separate gas forced air furnace installed in the attic.
Given the choices, I would prefer #1.
JK
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It wont separate billing it controls overheating. Its a tenant and he has to supply a certain amount of heat, Thousands for the convienence of a separate bill doesnt pay off, insulation does. Tenant pays heat, rents are less.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not being able to see how the setup is, it is not possible to say for sure, but most likely it can be separated. Given enough time and money, most anything like that can be done.
Assuming each has a completely different zone piping, those pipes can be re-routed to another smaller boiler. Does each have a separate how water supply too?
Electric heat will most likely require an upgrade on the service to 200A if you have less. It is also expensive to operate in most areas. Gas service may or may not be expensive but utility companies often offer deals for conversions or new customers.
Including the cost of heat int he lease can be risky if people abuse the use of heat, but it will cost thousands to add a new boiler and associated piping. Could be a long payback. Your old boiler may have to be de-rated also if you reduce the load considerably.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please learn to post to usenet the regular way.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put one of those locking plastic boxes (like you see in schools , hospitals and other commercial buildings) over the thermostats and set it at 68 degrees....
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd buy a good setback thermostat for the rental unit. Program it for them, show them how to use it and explain that the oil bill plays a large part in determining if you need to raise their rent. Then, keep an eye on the oil bill. Assuming you have some historical data, you should be able to tell if the bills are excessively high. If they are, then just raise the rent by enough to offset it and tell them why the rent is being increased.
As others have suggested, you CAN do just about anything. But given that you have a new boiler, installing a seperate heating system for the rental unit is going to have a very long payback. Plus, you'd have 2 systems to maintain, which will cost more than one.
Also, since the rental is on the second level, their heating reqts are probably going to be less than yours on the first floor. So, if you go with two seperate systems, you will probably still have a bigger oil bill than they do.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
lakeshow wrote:

You give them a separate zone and thermostat. Then you put in a second oil tank for them. They fill that one. Then you put in an oil valve that draws from their tank when their zone calls for heat and draws from your oil tank when your zone calls for heat and draws from both when both are calling for heat. If their tank is empty then no heat for them. You may have to invent that type of oil valve.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds to me like no heat for everybody when the tenant's tank runs dry, because as long as their apartment calls for heat, the furnace is going to be sucking air from the empty tank and then tripping off. Also, how are you going to ensure the oil flow when it's drawing from both tanks is divided up proportionaly? It's not even clear exactly what the right percentage should be, let alone what might happen with 2 tanks just plumbed together with valves.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.