Replace doorbell

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I think that's what I said -- that there is no rectifier in the doorbell system to change the house AC to DC for the doorbell. So, the doorbell operates on AC, not DC.
You wrote that the OP shouldn't worry because "It's DC". I was just pointing out that it is not DC that is powering the doorbell.
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Why not use common sense. Turn off half the breakers and see if the old doorbell still works. If it does not, then replace it and turn those breakers on. If the doorbell still works, turn those 1/2 breakers on and turn the other 1/2 off. That should stop the doorbell from working if it is on a breaker. Then replace the bell.
It is only 24 V at most on the secondary of the transformer if it is anywhere in the USA and will not kill you. The biggest problem is that if you get a shock you may make a sudden move and hurt your hand on something. But, to get a shock you have to have both wires energized, and that only happens when someone pushes the doorbell button, so keep eeryone who does not like you from pushing the doorbell pushbutton.
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On 11/21/2009 4:40 PM Jim spake thus:

>

Doorbells operate on AC, not DC.
And regarding the further conversation regarding conversion, etc., the only conversion going on is the stepping-down to low voltage AC by the transformer. (AC--> AC) No rectifiers used here.
--
I am a Canadian who was born and raised in The Netherlands. I live on
Planet Earth on a spot of land called Canada. We have noisy neighbours.
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Jumper the switch and then flip breakers until the noise stops.
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

and it rings once. The hammer in the doorbell doesn't retract until the current stops. It would work for a simple buzzer, though.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

If you have that kind, you could turn breakers off one at a time until you hear the "dong".
Or you could connect a buzzer for this purpose.
BTW, A neighbor had a problem in that she couldn't tell the difference between "ding dong" for the front door and "ding" for the back door (or the "ding ding" that happens with over-excited button pushers). I added a buzzer across the front door solenoid. The only buzzer I had at the time was a DC pulsating buzzer. After adding the rectifier and capacitor, she had a unique doorbell. It sounds the same for the back door, but for the front you hear "ding dong" along with a non-confusable "BEEP-BEEP-beep-beep-bip-bip". That house has been sold twice since then and that thing is still there.
--
33 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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