Reparing Leak in Tire Side Wall

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wrote:

If indeed these benefits to the dealer do exist, then it is "quite obvious" there is a benefit to the owner as well - which over the life of the tires is "definitely" worth $10.

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wrote:

And the real truth of the matter is MOST tire shops either do not have a drier or do not maintain it faithfully - so you are not getting "dry" air.

And who pays for the quite substantial cost of the machine in the first place??

The bottom line is you can be cheap if you want. Doesn't mean other tire buyers have to follow your lead.
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wrote:

So all "discernable advantages" should be paid for by someone else and provided to you for free?? Sounds a little bitopportunistic anda lot like a bad case of "entitlement"
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On Fri, 7 Nov 2014 09:00:40 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

If you lose 10% of your nitrogen and replace it with air, the tire now has 2% non nitrogen , compared to 20% if initially filled with nitrogen.
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I have a 2007 and 2008 and the TPMS have failed on both of them. I have no intention of getting them replaced. I think I was quoted a proce of about $ 60 to $ 80 for each wheel. That is getting close to the price of a tire.
The 2007 has about 55,000 miles on it and the 2008 has about 25, 000 on it. I hae replaced the factory tires on both of them with some 80,000 mile tires. I should trade by the time I need tires again.
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On 11/07/2014 11:55 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

...
Over the years I've had at least four vehicles can remember had TPMS systems and have yet to have the first failure. The last Le Sabre was over 10 yo and 180k miles when it went. I don't recall the previous one's age (it was folk's when we came back so didn't have quite the direct connection for total recall). The so-equipped two vehicles presently are '10 and '11 so they're still almost brand new by my counting scheme...
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Read all it
https://powertank.com/truth.or.hype/
Mark
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And even more to read here http://www.hg.org/article.asp?id 113
Mark
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wrote:

Is that your car? I don't have TPMS on my car, but I keep a tire gauge in my glovebox, and occasionally check all tires. If leakage is excessive I get it fixed. That seldom happens. If I had TPMS and it worked, I would do the same, less the check. I haven't had trouble with tire wear.

Oil change is the only one on my car. What others are available? I don't understand this sudden interest in nitrogen. Tire Rack says: "Overall, inflating tires with nitrogen won't hurt them and may provide some minimal benefits." "Rather than pay extra for nitrogen, most drivers would be better off buying an accurate tire pressure gauge and checking and adjusting their tire pressures regularly."
Doubt I'll ever put nitrogen in my tires. None of the "minimal benefits" even apply to me, or most drivers. But if it's free I won't turn it down.
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On Friday, November 7, 2014 2:24:09 PM UTC-5, Vic Smith wrote:


And here's what Michelin says:
"Nitrogen Versus Compressed Air Most tires are filled with compressed air. But some tire retailers have sta rted to put nitrogen into their customers' tires. (Nitrogen is simply dry a ir with the oxygen removed. Air contains nearly 79% nitrogen already.) Beca use nitrogen replaces oxygen, less air can escape your tires, and your infl ation pressure stays higher longer. Unfortunately, there are other possible sources of leaks (tire/rim interface, valve, valve/rim interface and the w heel) which prevent the guarantee of pressure maintenance for individuals u sing air or nitrogen inflation. Nitrogen and compressed air CAN be mixed, if needed. Tires manufactured by Michelin are designed to deliver their expected performance when inflated w ith air or nitrogen, as long as the user respects the pressures recommended by the vehicle manufacturer on the vehicle's placard or by the tire manufa cturer."
Not exactly a ringing endorsement either.
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ok enough about the nitrogen
what about the water vapor.
I refill my tires with compressed air from my little compressor that has no dryer and i notice the moisture that squirts out.
Is there any bad effect to the tires due to the moisture?
My theory is that when the tire heats up the moisture is driven out of the tire eventually through the permiability of the rubber.
Mark
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On 11/7/2014 2:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes.
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On Friday, November 7, 2014 5:18:30 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Heh, I refill my tires most of the time the same way. Home air compresssor, no dryer. And I don't have early tread failure, warranty claims. I'm not running back to Costco screaming, OMG my tires failed! Warranty claim! Maybe my tires are unique, or maybe someone else here is full of BS.
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On 11/7/2014 4:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

How about this theory?
You drive your car, say, 100 miles and get the internal temperature up there a bit, with me so far?
So you pull up and park around sunset and it happened to rain that day so you park in a little puddle.
Now, as the tire cools down and does it suck water from the puddle into the tire through that same permeable rubber?
Inquiring minds will not enjoy a good night's sleep until this is answered. ;)
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On Fri, 7 Nov 2014 12:55:46 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Either tires are a LOT cheaper in the USA than in Canada (I know they are somewhat cheaper) or you are buying crappy tires. I haven't bought a tire for less than $118 on sale in quite a few years - and I don't have 17 inch or larger rims or super low profile tires.

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wrote:

There is talk of making TPMS and stability control mandatory on all vehicles in North America within 5 years.
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On 11/7/2014 5:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had an instance where stability control kicked in on my car during an evasive move on wet roadway. My guess is if I had my other car I'd be going sideways across the median, possibly rolling. Great system that kept me solid like I was on rails.
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wrote:

Have you priced a nitrogen filling unit?? Average cost is somewhere close to $8000 for the required equipment. Not sure what the maintenance cost is.

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I was somewhat low on the tire prices. I put a good grade of Michelin tires on. They are about $ 125 each. This is just a standard Toyota. Still that $ 60 to $ 80 just for the sensor is way too high. I bet they only cost about $ 10 or less to make. Especially in the large quantites they are mass produced in. The tires did come with free rotation and flat repair. If you have to pay someone to rotate the tires two times a year, you might say the tires are almost free after 5 or 6 years.
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On 11/7/2014 3:36 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Costco charged $45 for an after-market sensor for a 2007 Toyota Camry. There would be no extra installation cost if replaced at the time tires are replaced.
The manufacturing cost is immaterial, but it's probably about $3, not $10.
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