Reparing Leak in Tire Side Wall

Page 4 of 9  
wrote:

the second bead, then inflate to low pressure, bounce the wheel, and inflate to seat the bead. Sure isn't rocket science!!!
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On Thu, 06 Nov 2014 09:11:49 -0500, Stormin Mormon

something a lot stiffer and thicker than nitrogen to keep the heat in!!! (like good foam insulation, perhaps)
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On 11/6/2014 12:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

cellulose. Problem solved.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Thu, 6 Nov 2014 06:34:47 +0100, nestork

Where it DOES make a significant difference. EXTREME temperature and pressure differences during every takeoff and landing.
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On 11/6/2014 12:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Been a WHILE since I saw it, but one SHOW had a feature about a PLANE that got into TROUBLE. The guys had RUN OUT of nitrogen, and left the TIRE a bit soft. That caused a CRASH.
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On Thursday, November 6, 2014 12:54:49 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Here's a couple of Boeing videos that show why you need nitrogen in airplane tires. It's the rejected takeoff test of the 777, stopping 750K pounds going at 160mph. That plane is a great American achievement, the best plane I've ever flown on. I went from JFK to Hong Kong, 16+ hours, non-stop on one. And over the north pole, if something goes wrong, there isn't a handy airport nearby.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
LFErD-yls

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr4V680UQ-k

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On 11/06/2014 11:46 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

But that's not the reason for using it--it's still an essentially ideal gas at those pressures (roughly 200 psi) so the pressure fluctuations are no different than with air (which, remember is 80% N to start with).
The reason is to eliminate the entrapped water vapor that can turn to ice crystals at high altitude. I suppose there's a very slight improvement in minimizing pressure loss owing to diffusion at the low pressure of high altitude since N permeability is about a third less than that of O, but given the duration of flights and the religiosity with which stuff is checked I really doubt the effect would be measurable within the allowed precision.
The same effect could be accomplished by purging and using dry air or any other (non-explosive) gas with a molecular weight as great or greater than O2 as long as one displaced the air vapor in free air.
It's those secondary effects that are the only real benefits that is why for ordinary application in passenger car/light trucks it's _way_ overkill in that there just won't be any discernible symptoms that it cures that ordinary care and maintenance don't resolve, anyway.
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On 11/06/2014 1:11 PM, dpb wrote: ...

ERRATUM: ...displaced "WATER VAPOR", not air, of course...
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On 11/06/2014 1:11 PM, dpb wrote: ...

Or, use He and gain some lift :) . At the (very) approximate cost of 3X the effusion rate for pressure loss during the flight.
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On Tuesday, November 4, 2014 11:55:53 AM UTC-7, Sasquatch Jones wrote:

ire is tubeless radial. Is it possible to patch something like this on the side wall? Patch kits say they are for the tread but don't say specifical ly not to use them on the side.

I was told by a service station operator that my sidewall break was unrepai rable. I took it to a tire shop where they repaired it but cautioned that t he tire should only be used as a spare and if so used should be driven at s peeds under 40 mph. ===
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On Thu, 06 Nov 2014 12:51:01 -0500, Stormin Mormon

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yup, works great 98% of the time. I put a Kenda 21" knobby on the front wheel of one of the bikes. The rear went like planned, but that damn front bead would not seat. I aired it up to 90 psi, aired it down, poured on soapy water, beat on it, took it out for a ride, and it finally seated. I'm going back to Dunlop 606's next time.
I learned to deal with tubes damn near 60 years ago changing tires on my genuine 'English' bicycle with the three speed Sturmey-Archer planetary hub. I also learned there are a lot of springs in one of those things, but that's another story.
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Different tire. Absolutely no comparison after the part about rubber and round.
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SMS;3305420 Wrote: > On 11/5/2014 9:34 PM, nestork wrote:

> lasting

> because

I beg to differ. I recall listening to Don Cherry when he said that when hockey players never wore helmets or mouth guards everyone kept their sticks down and the puck on the ice because they knew that a stick or puck in the face or head was dangerous. Now that everyone wears helmets and is biting down on a mouth guard, the sticks and pucks are in the air, and people are getting seriously injured by high sticks and flying pucks.
We see exactly the same thing outside the hockey arena. When there was an electrical blackout in New York City about 10 years ago and the subways stopped running, everyone peacefully filed out of the subway system and walked home after work and there was no crime in New York City during that black out. That's because everyone realized that this was a potentially dangerous situation that could turn into anarchy and everyone had to help everyone else out to prevent that from happening. So, people restrained themselves to ensure the city didn't turn into a crime spree zone during the black out.
What I'm saying is that if people are aware of a common danger that threatens everyone, they will co-operate to protect themselves and each other from that danger. If people know that ordinary air is more prone to seep out of their tires, they'll be more diligent about monitoring the air pressure in their tires, just as hockey players that aren't wearing helmets co-operate in keeping their sticks and pucks down for the benefit of everyone.
It's the psychology of the situation that dictates that people that are aware of a potential problem will monitor that situation more diligently than if they are less concerned about that problem.
--
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Probably has not changed, but with global warming there are no guaranties.
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Ten bucks it ten bucks. I'd rather pay it at Starbucks than buying air for my tires.
Nitrogen is snake oil, one. It's already in the air, two.
Pay for it if you want, but you might as well light your money on fire.
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FOR THE RECORD I amnot against nitrogen. Nitorgen is good. It's not worth paying for. If the store wants to give it away, then buy your tires there. But if the tire store wants an other ten bucks or more, then pass.
Nitrogen is going to seep out and you will go to the gas station and use the machine to refill your tires, and this will dilute the nitrogen. After you put air into the tires a few times, you will have the same concentration of nitrogen that already exists in free air.
ALL I AM SAYING IS, DO NOT PAY FOR NITROGEN, and give peace a chance...
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wrote:

Obvious you've never been in the automotive service or tire business!!
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wrote:

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On Fri, 7 Nov 2014 08:55:11 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

so, then P!$$ it down the drain!!
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