Reparing Leak in Tire Side Wall

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On Thu, 6 Nov 2014 07:29:07 -0500, "repairman54"

BEHIND you, and with less tread on the rear, it WILL come around just when you least expect it. This is why in MOST jurisdictions it is ILLEGAL to put snows on the front only on a front wheel drive car.
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On 11/6/2014 12:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

the NEW TIRES on the drive wheels. Which in MY CASE is the BACK. That didn't MUCH help when I got HIT BY a semi driver on THE HIGHWAY. My vehicle SLID SIDE WAYS and then tipped UP on its SIDE and slid SOME MORE.
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wrote:

have only had 4 tires go flat on the road - 2 from cracked valve stems. Those 46 years included a couple million miles of driving on 2 continents.
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On 11/6/2014 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A COUPLE of years back, I noticed my VAN was NOT QUITE right. I was on the 55 zone limited ACCESS ROAD, so I pulled over at an EXIT and turns out one TIRE had SEPARATED at the side wall. Ended up call AAA and get FLAT BEDDED home. the next day I took OFF the TIRE AND brought it back to WALMART, as I had the WARRANTY. Inside, I noticed I'd PICKED up a NAIL through the TREAD. Back home, and PUT the new TIRE back on.
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That should make a case for rotating the tires every 5000 or whatever miles. They all have about the same ammount of tread and should all be replaced at the same time.
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On Thu, 6 Nov 2014 13:14:01 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

and put on the summers opposite of how they came off. I never rotate tires left to right.
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'Stormin Mormon[_10_ Wrote: > ;3304880']

100% true, but oxygen is more "electronegative", which means that it hoards it's electrons more closely to it's nucleus. It's the fact that the electron shells around an oxygen nucleus are smaller that make oxygen a smaller atom than nitrogen and O2 a smaller molecule than N2.
Except for Fluorine at 4.0, Oxygen is the most highly electronegative atom on the periodic table at 3.5
'Bond Polarity' (http://tinyurl.com/o577e5s )
You gotta know this stuff to be king.
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On 11/5/2014 8:03 PM, nestork wrote:

Well, I'd not heard that. But then, I didn't take some of the higher level college courses. Thanks for helping me understand.
I guess if I filled my trailer with nitrogen, I'd have less air leakage, and keep the heat in better?
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 18:33:15 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

maintained pressure better than when inflated with 80% nitrogen. Marginally - but enough that I'll pay the $10 for a set of 4. You may not find it worth while. That is your perogotive.

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Specially in cold weather region like where I live. I can see less pressure fluctuation with N filled tires by monitoring with TPMS on the dash. N is not snake oil at least for me.
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 15:50:44 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

$10.00??? Or even on a $600.00 purchace.
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On 11/5/2014 9:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If I spend $1000 for tires, the least you can do is give me the nitrogen that cost you 50 cents to make.
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Jeff Strickland wrote:

I'll try to remember that the next time I'm mounting new tires on my bike.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The 'know what you are doing' part is the rub. I bought a set of tube type tires in Knoxville and the inbred knuckledraggers managed to pinch all four tubes. Thanks to copious quantities of fix-a-flat and a portable air pump, I made it back to Arizona. Mexican mechanics still understand tubes.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I had a set of Nokian studs on the last car. One thing Finns understand is driving on ice and snow. They even make studded bicycle tires.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca;3304912 Wrote: >

Clare...
The fact that the cost is small compared to a new set of tires really isn't, and shouldn't be, the issue. The point is that paying $10 for nitrogen in a new set of tires costing $600 is still a waste of $10, and there's nothing good, admirable or even sexy about wasting anything, even a lowly 1.7 percent. I would no more pay $10 to have nitrogen in my tires than I would pay $20 to have a factory racing stripe painted onto my car. In both cases I know I'm wasting my money, and my brain is hard wired to avoid that.
In fact, a good arguement can be made AGAINST the use of nitrogen in a car's tires. Having the driver of the car acutely aware that ordinary air leaks out of the car's tires a tiny bit faster helps to ensure the driver pays attention to his car's tires and their inflation pressure, and that alone is worth more than $10 in fuel savings and longer lasting tires. With nitrogen in the tires, vehicle owners may be more complacent about looking at and paying attention to their tires because with nitrogen in them, they may feel they don't need to pay as close attention.
Bottom line here is that they should change the name from "Nitrogen" to "Racing Air" and it'd probably sell like crazy. After all, everyone knows that ordinary air is 78 percent nitrogen anyway. Racing air, on the other hand, is obviously what high performance cars use, so it might be worth the extra ten bucks in better performance.
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On Thursday, November 6, 2014 1:17:12 AM UTC-5, nestork wrote:

There's still a difference. At least with racing stripes you have something that's visible and if you like it, then it's worth it. In the case of nitrogen, what you have is 99% marketing gimmick to add $$ to the bottom line. AFAIK, what they have done is extend nitrogen from critical applications where the difference it makes can matter, to the family car, where the difference is negligible.
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just like the added wing type spoiler on the trunk of some cars. Or like a diamond ring costing several thousand dollars. Not good for much,but people think they want it. The nitrogen is not visiable to look at nor will it do any good that I am aware of.
I thought I read somewhere about nitrogen in airplane tires had some kind of advantage, but that could have just been some internet dribble.
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'Stormin Mormon[_10_ Wrote: > ;3305044']

No idea what you mean. (?)
Are you talking about filling your trailer TIRES with nitrogen, or filling the living space of your trailer with nitrogen?
If it's the latter, you can't have air leakage if there's no air inside the trailer to begin with. Also, I don't know why there would be any difference in heat loss from the trailer living space if it was filled with nitrogen. (?) It would seem to me that would be entirely dependant on the insulation (if any) you have in the walls of the trailer and the temperature difference across those walls. I don't see any reason for nitrogen to be any warmer than air under the same circumstances.
Probably a better idea would be to fill the living space of your trailer with helium and invite everyone over to have a Funny Voice party.
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On 11/6/2014 11:23 AM, nestork wrote:

or throwing my nonsense back at me.
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Christopher A. Young
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