Reparing Leak in Tire Side Wall

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I have a slow lead in the side wall that came from scraping some kind of sharp object laying by the curb. Looks like a 1/2-inch cut, but jagged. Tire is tubeless radial. Is it possible to patch something like this on the side wall? Patch kits say they are for the tread but don't say specifically not to use them on the side.
2nd thought -- can I put a tube in it? Seems like I remember tire places say tubeless can't be fixed with a tube, but I can't see why not.
Anyway, thanks in advance for any help.
SJ
++++++++++++++++++++ You cannot repair a sidewall. Let me say that differently, go to the tire store where they fix tires that leak, they will not repair a sidewall.
You need to buy a new tire.
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writes:

Worst advice ever. A tube will not work, that's why they do not put them in. Firstly, without a rim that can be taken apart, the tire mounting machine can pinch the tube and damage it before the first pound of air goes in. Secondly, tubeless tires are built differently than tube-type tires. Thirdly, the sidewall of a tire is by design the weakest part of the tire, it is typically two-ply where the tread is four-ply. The sidewall constantly moves and changes shape, and if there is a tear, then the tear will be even weaker and a catastrophic failure is all but certain.
At best, a tube will hold air. It will not make the sidewall sufficient to carry the vehicle. Do not put a tube into a tubeless tire. You have to go to the tire store to have the tire and rim broken down, so they are the venue for putting the tube in and they will not do it.
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On Wednesday, November 5, 2014 1:11:58 PM UTC-5, Jeff Strickland wrote:

Total nonsense. Autos, AFAIK, never had rims that came apart and tires with tubes were mounted to them before the switch to all tubeless.

That's probably true. IDK about putting a tube in a tubeless, other than I've never seen it done.

Agree that I would not patch a sidewall.
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On 11/5/2014 1:11 PM, Jeff Strickland wrote:

Just out of morbid curiosity, did you ever work at a place that installed tires (I did). If you had, you would know that practically all auto and light truck rims are one piece (the OP didn't say what kid of vehicle). You would also know that tires with tubes were routinely installed on those rims without incident (except for the odd idiot that was not paying attention to what he was doing). There was also a specific tube for radial tires that could stand more flex than tubes for bias ply tire tubes. A puncture in a bias ply sidewall could be repaired. Not so for a radial. However, if it was just a puncture the radial could be used by putting in the proper tube.
I agree that in this case the tire should be replaced, but not for the reason you state.
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On 11/6/2014 10:31 AM, Mike wrote:

Good thing you did not say what those reasons are. We'd not want you to educate anyone.
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writes:

You are correct, there is no steel in the sidewall. Steel belts are only in the tread area.
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And, you do not need onen tire, you need two unless the tires on your car are reasonably new and still available. The rule of thumb is that you should have matched tires on the same axle, both size and style/model of tire. The exception is when you put the spare on, but then you should do tire repairs or replacements and put the spare back into the trunk.
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I have a slow lead in the side wall that came from scraping some kind of sharp object laying by the curb. Looks like a 1/2-inch cut, but jagged. Tire is tubeless radial. Is it possible to patch something like this on the side wall? Patch kits say they are for the tread but don't say specifically not to use them on the side.
2nd thought -- can I put a tube in it? Seems like I remember tire places say tubeless can't be fixed with a tube, but I can't see why not.
Anyway, thanks in advance for any help.
== Thanks many times over everyone! Both front tires are both close to needing replacing anyway. I'll catch one of the Veterans Day sales.
I like America's Tire Stores, www.tires.com
Tire Rack, www.tirerack.com, is also a good choice. At Tire Rack, they ship tires to you, and you take them to the tire store and pay an installation charge. You can call the installer and see if they accept a drop-shipment. America's Tire has a competitive price and they will get whatever you need shipped in for free.
Costco has a limited selection, but the selection they have is pretty good. They generally have a Good, Better, and Best option for each size.
DO NOT PAY EXTRA FOR NITROGEN. This is snake oil for tires. It might work as claimed, but the air we breathe already is full of nitrogen. My only point is, do not pay an upcharge for nitrogen. If they do it for free, then do not refuse. But do not pay extra.
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Oh, thanks. We all needed someone to quibble over what the word "work" means.
I think my post was clear enough.
--
Dan Espen

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That's the point, a tube should not work. A tube has Epic Fail written all over it, hence, "Worst advice ever." I cleared your post up.
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 10:11:48 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

Jeff, tubes have been used on steel safety rims for several decades. That's the exact same rim used on today's cars (alloy wheels have the same rim profiles) You just have to know what you are doing. I've installed a few hundred tires with tubes over my life as amechanic - only damaged a very few tubes.
The bigger problem is tubeless tires have ridges on the inside that cause heating when the flex against a tube - and radials are worse than bias ply. There ARE special tubes made for use in radial tires that work in tubeless tires but are NOT recommended for high speeds.
Also a bruised sidewall is likely to also damage the tube by abrasion

Worse yet, the fabric on a radial sidewall is RADIAL - which makes it even more fragile than a bias ply sidewall

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On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 10:24:36 -0800, "Jeff Strickland"

Up to $2.50 per tire extra for nitrogen fill can be rationalized. Any more is highway robbery.
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On 11/05/2014 4:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

"Rationalized" on basis of dealer cost, maybe, but I can't see there's anything close to the payback possible for an ordinary passenger car tire on an automobile driven routinely.
What minimal advantages there are really only accrue for extremely long intervals between changes such as collector or antique vehicles or very specialized applications such as racing or hazard duty where the flammability in accident might conceivably be an added risk.
Otherwise, just nothing that it does is sufficient to make any discernible difference in the bottom line to the end user.
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No, nitrogen is snake oil. The air we breathe is already something like 80% nitrogen. You can do a search, but paying a tire shop for nitrogen is a waste of money, $10.00 using your threshold.
It's not bad, it's only not worth paying for.
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With the air in the tire already 80% nitrogen and the outside of all tires has the same mix of 80 % nitrogen and 20% oxygen (with a trace of other elements) what good does the all nitrogen do ? Especially if the car is not driven enough to heat up the tires.
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The idea is that a molecule of nitrogen is larger, therefore it will seep out slower. Let's assume this is true, is it worth money to forestall putting more air into the tires someday? There's NOTHING WRONG with nitrogen, the problem is paying for it.
'Buy our tires and get free nitrogen,' is a good sales pitch.
'Buy our tires, we'll put in nitrogen for ten bucks,' is ten bucks too much.
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On 11/5/2014 6:50 PM, Jeff Strickland wrote:

It's been a few decades, but nitrogen atomic weight 14, oxygen is 16.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Sasquatch Jones posted for all of us...
Along with all the posts in the thread the OP admits he needs new tires anyway...
The latest information I have read is that the best tread should be mounted to the rear axle.
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2x on that. Best tires on the rear axle. It's easier to control a blowout on the front, you can still steer. Rear blowouts are prone to causing the rear to come around, IE spin out.
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On Thursday, November 6, 2014 7:30:41 AM UTC-5, repairman54 wrote:

The actual rationale is that less tread = more possibility of sliding in adverse weather conditions. Your average driver's reflexes handle understeer (front sliding) much better than oversteer (rear sliding)
Personally if my tires are thin enough that I'm worried about blowouts, in my mind it's about time for new tires...
nate
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