repapering walls


I want to repaper the walls in the kitchen. I was hoping to avoid taking the old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?
Thanks,
Jean
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yes, and probably not.
nate
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I want to repaper the walls in the kitchen. I was hoping to avoid taking the old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?
Thanks,
Jean
Maybe but I have a moral responsibity not to tell you about it.
Hanging wallpaper should rank right up there with owning duck tape. Both should require a license.
And to qualify you should have to remove repair some of the abominations created by ill informed users.
Do it right or don't do it at all.
Strip, wash and size the walls preferably over an oil paint base coat tinted to about the BG color of the paper.
Colbyt
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--WebTV-Mail-6877-2876 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
In the kitchen especially, don't stint on wallcovering prices.
Get a good fabric backed, vinyl coated covering - brand name like Sanitas.
Don't waste your time mixing powdered wallpaper paste with water - go the extra few bucks and buy premixed liquid adhesive made for vinyl wallcoverings. Don't know how big your kitchen is, so start with a gallon.
The most important and time consuming part of this project is prep.
Do it like Colbyt says.
--WebTV-Mail-6877-2876 Content-Description: signature Content-Disposition: Inline Content-Type: Text/HTML; Charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: Quoted-Printable
<html><body> <font size="5" color="000000" effect="relief">Joe</font></body></html>
--WebTV-Mail-6877-2876--
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old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?

Feather it out with drywall compound. Take time to make sure everything is smooth, else it won't ever look good.
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Jean wrote:

old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?

I have papered a number of rooms,and would never paint or paper over old paper. Remove it comepletely; spackling seams will not hide them. I papered a kitchen years ago with a good vinyl coated paper. The kitchen got dirty and steamy, as we had no exhaust hood. Even with many cleanings, it stayed intact for the 13 years afterward that I lived in the house.
I strip paper using coarse sandpaper to cut the surface, spray with warm water, soak, spray again, soak, and start gently scraping. Don't need chemicals, as water softens the paste.
I learned from a pro to use half-strength paste on pre-pasted paper, rather than immersing pre-pasted in plain water. Have done it both ways with good results. Gotta be careful not to stretch the paper when you apply it to the wall, as that is what leaves gaps (cheap paper may also shrink).
In kitchens and baths, I run a very fine line of silicone caulk along the bottom of the paper - moisture/steam can run down the wall and seep under edge. I also caulked along the edge of the paper in our master bath that runs along the corner of the shower stall - paper has been there about 10 years with no loose corners or seams. I taped the edge of the paper where it adjoins the tile so that the caulk line is white and same color and width as the tile grout joint; very light application, smoothed out and tape removed right away.
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wrote:

Thanks! I'm not the OP, but I'm saving that great advice for if and when!
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Higgs Boson wrote:

old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?

You're welcome, and thank you. Nice to be appreciated :o)
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Higgs Boson wrote:

old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?

And don't forget that reconstituting wallpaper paste enough to soften it takes a lot of patience....it is sneaky, and if the plan is to paint the wall, make a final check with light shone across the wall to see if there is paste remaining. Leftover paste will leave a pattern that shows through paint. When I'm removing wallpaper, I usually let the wall "rest", dry out, before the final washdown. You can tell when it is starting to dampen the paper covering of drywall, and you don't want that shredding.
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Thanks for the tip about caulking around the edges - I haven't heard that one before and it seems (no pun intended) like a great idea.
Jean
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I want to repaper the walls in the kitchen. I was hoping to avoid taking the old paper down, but there are gaps between the seams in the old paper and I thought they might show through on the new paper. Will they show through? If so, is there any sort of "filler" that I can use to get rid of the gaps before repapering?
Thanks,
Jean
Why in the world would you want to put more up there once you get this down? Unless, of course, we're talking about the red/black or purple/yellow fleur de lis New Orleans brothel type.
Steve
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