Repairing UF cable

Hi all,
I was just wondering how you repair a cut UF cable (i.e. say cut by a trencher) - can you repair it underground or is a new run required?
And no, I haven't cut it yet.
Thanks, Budman
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I'm not an electrician (nor do I play one on TV), but I recently saw this item, which appears to be made for splicing UF cable underground: http://tinyurl.com/dukxh . Hope it helps!
-- Vinnie
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wrote:

They sell the same product at home depot.
Might want to check with codes, since it's possible this splice might have to be accessible, meaning not burried, if this is the case with you.
hth,
tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com
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This is probably not up to code, but I did it once when someone ran over my cable to a shed with a rotatiller, and chopped the wire. I dug up a few feet in each direction. I then had to add a short piece of cable, thus make 2 splices. The first thing was to clean the cable real well. Then I slipped an 8 inch piece of 3/4" automotive heater hose over one end of the cable and just let it hang there for now. I twisted each wire together and soldered them. Then I taped each wire real well. After that, I taped the whole bundle, and slipped the piece of hose over the splice, being sure its centered. over the splice. Then I took a tube of pure GE Silicone and pumped the caulking gun into the hose until the caulk came out the other end of the hose. Then I rotated the hose around the cable to spread the silicone, and pumped more in there. I finished by being sure the globs of silicone on each end had no holes. Then I let it dry before I spliced the next joint. It worked for years, and probably still is, but I moved from that place.
The whole joint was coated with a thick layer of silicone, so water could not get in there.
TIP: Be sure you put the hose on one of the pieces of cable BEFORE you twist and solder, or you got to start over. When I made the second splice, I took a magic marker and marked the cable 4 inches from the end, so I knew the hose was centered on the splice. (on the first one, I was a little unsure by the time I finished).
By the way, this was just 12-2 +ground. For a heavier cable, you will need a thicker hose. You will use lots of silicone. Get several tubes, and I suggest gloves. This was pretty messy. In fact when I did the second splice, I wrapped a strip of cloth around the hose when I had all the silicone in the hose, because the first one dripped out and I had to fill the ends a little more later, plus dirt was stuck to it.
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wrote:

So why are you describing how you did it?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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050429 0801 - Doug Miller posted:

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On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 12:01:40 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Guilt.
:p
later,
tom @ www.CarFleaMarket.com
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So what would be to code?
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