repairing torn drywall paper

I'm sure this has been covered but after a week of scraping 1960's-era wallpaper off of most of the walls in my new house, I can't seem to focus enough on past threads to find the answer.
In the process of removing the wallpaper, there was quite a bit of damage to the paper on the drywall in some places. A painting contractor recommended we use Gardz before spackling, to ensure that the wallboard doesn't absorb the water and bubble. We can't seem to find Gardz around where we live. A paint supply store said that B-I-N would do the same thing, but after buying some, we're not so sure it's good for that use.
In doing some research online, I've seen that there are other products like Gardz out there (again, can't seem to buy them LOCALLY, and time is an issue here). I've also read instructions that say you can just put a skim coat over the torn paper spots and that will work just fine.
SO...do I have to use Gardz or a similar product specifically for repairing torn drywall paper? Will the B-I-N I bought work just as well? Is is possible just to spackle and be done with it?? Any help anyone can offer me here would be GREATLY appreciated!
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I've had this same problem in the past. I put a coat of mud over the damaged area and 2 coats of B-I-N after the mud dried. It worked just fine for me, but it's only been 8 months since I did the work. I can't guaranty you that it's a perfect seal, but it's the best I can tell you.
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Lisa wrote:

I've done some repairs just using the mud with no extra prep other than making sure the remaining paper was tight. I lasted many years without a problem. Your mileage may vary.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com (Lisa) wrote in

....
Been there - Done that. I had so many problems (holes, joints that were never taped, cracks etc) that I ended up skim coating the walls with drywall mud and priming before two coats of good paint.
NJBrad
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On 9 Feb 2004 19:13:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com (Lisa) wrote:

I'd recommend it.
Will the B-I-N I bought work just as

No. Is is possible just to spackle and be done with it??
Yes, if you take the time to sand down the loose paper to the point where you'll have a solid surface to skim over.
Any help

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Lisa wrote:

Prime x2 after repairing. I don't know what "quite a bit of damage" is, but I've messed up the paper removing wallpaper a few times. You can't sand the paper, so the best fix, for me, has been to cut away the torn edge with a razor blade, then spackle the defect. Feather out the primer, applying thin coats, so you don't have a distinct edge to the primed area. Best to apply it with a small roller, so you don't have perfectly flat patches surrounded by previously rolled paint. Works for me :o)
If you have deep defects, you may need two applications of spackle, as it shrinks a bit.
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snipped-for-privacy@twcny.rr.com (Lisa) wrote in message
<snip>

Any good oil-based primer will work. Zinsser 123 worked fine for me. Ask at a paint store for a recommendation, they'll know. Ventilate the area if you're doing a large area, I spent an evening hallucinating after doing all the walls in a small room...interesting but no desire to repeat...no apparent braim danage.
Mitch
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