repairing plastic housing

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I am trying to repair a housing for a pool pump. It split under pressure at the seam. http://memphis.craigslist.org/wan/3139489682.html I was thinking of epoxing the housing back together.
Do you think epoxy will withstand a 70 psi load? Afterwards I was thinking of putting in a couple of screw and reinforcing the repair. Will that be enough?
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I doubt it.
A pool requires lots of parts replacements. Don't fight it.
--
Dan Espen

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Does it make sense to spend $60-100 to replace this, or should I replace the entire housing in the off season where I can buy it for cheap.
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You don't sound like a pool owner.
You're supposed to pour money into it like you have money to spare.
--
Dan Espen

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So, you're saying he sounds like a pool gardener?
--
Dan Espen

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Can you drill some small holes and use copper or stainless stell wire to hold the pump together, and then epoxy the heck out of everything? The wire would take the tension/stress. The Epoxy would make it watertight.
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I have done repairs like that. CLEAN the parts very well. Use JB weld (the 24 hour stuff, not the quick type) Add fiber glass sheet material across the crack embedded in the JB weld on inside AND outside. That adds much strength. WW
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I would be inclined to say plumbers goop would work as good as anything, after it dries for a few days. Tough stuff.
Greg
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I've not heard of this stuff. If you can find it online, please post a link so we can see what you mean.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I would be inclined to say plumbers goop would work as good as anything, after it dries for a few days. Tough stuff.
Greg
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If you ever tried to take apart something that had used plumbers goop, you know what I mean. It's slightly flexible, so it does not crack or break loose like epoxy. It says non pressure applications, but not great for higher temps.
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/compound.html
Greg
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wrote:

Not to be used on pressureized stuff. WW
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That's what they say, but for this application I think it's best. I should have recommended marine goop. With uv protection.
There is also plumbers epoxy, but i don't know about the part about sticking to various plastics.
Plastic pump sucks.!!!
Greg
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On Sat, 14 Jul 2012 13:03:36 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

Depends on the type of plastic. Some can be welded with heat, others will not take adhesive or epoxy at all. None I would trust with 70 psi running while I was not watching it.
What made it crack? Once repaired, what makes you think it will not crack again? If the material is old and brittle, it is junk.
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On 7/14/2012 5:48 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Seventy psi is really not a lot of pressure but poor adhesion or brittle plastic is bound to fail again. Some polymers like polyethylene are impossible to glue but epoxy wrapped with something like a layer of fiberglass fabric will give a strong mechanical solution.
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wrote:

No.
epoxy,then use a metal patch with screws,but covered with epoxy for a better seal and more bond surface area.
One problem; epoxy takes a couple of WEEKS to FULLY cure and reach full strength.

the seam failed. that doesn't sound like a "crack".

it's worth a shot if a new pump is expensive. plus,he didn't say whether the pump is "old" or relatively new. (but out of warranty)
I'd try to find out if others have had similar seam failures in that model of pump. Maybe he can persuade the MFG to replace it at their expense. Maybe there's a hidden "extended warranty".
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I'd check to see if it were still under some warranty

Test some PVC glue on the pump. If epoxy is unfamiliar to you, maybe PVC glue, with the fiberglass mesh/wrap, will work. Maybe even a screw clamp or 2 to keep it more stable, also.
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wrote:

Yes, actually. If the seam was the parting line of the mold it was probably a weak point. If it is a two piece unit that was gasketed closed, it would not be a seam.
The photo did not tell much of a story to be sure exactly what happened.
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I flipped the diverter valve from "Waste" to "Backflush" without shutting down the pump. WHile doing this, the pressure inside shot up. BTW, the unit is 17 years old, so maybe the plastic has weathered.
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If this is an above ground 17 yr old pool, get a new pump.
If this is a below ground pool, what the heck are you doing skimping on the repair. You can surely afford a new pump. Get a new pump.
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I was thinking of fixing this a different way looking at other designs in the pool store. I was thinking of taking two pieces of wood plates about 2 inches bigger than the housing and putting them on both sides (pancaking). I would run 6 long bolts between the housing. THis would apply pressure to keep the crack closed. Right now, I put a couple of C clamps on it to allow the epoxy to set.
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