Repairing Inflatable Cushion


A relative uses an inflatable plastic seat cushion, and it has a leak. I was able to localize the leak to a particular plastic seam but taping this did not repair the leak. Can someone recommend an appropriate material / glue to fix this sort of thing?
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W



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W wrote:

You might try using a water bed repair kit.
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Ditto on the waterbed kit. My waterbed sprung a leak, and I found the original patch kit. It was not even a glue type, but peel and stick. I was skeptical. Man, that sucker STUCK!
Steve
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W wrote the following:

I repair holes in our plastic pool floats with clear silicone caulk. It works well in locations where a patch would be ineffective, like seams, or around air valves. I still have pool floats that have had holes patched with silicone caulk 3 or 4 years ago. I used to patch holes in the water bags that held down the winter pool cover, but I switched to the spring loaded mesh type cover two years ago.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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It comes in a small tube.
Charlie
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http://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Plastic&that=Plastic
    "There are so many kinds of plastic its hard to give advice      here that applies to them all. If possible try a small      test in an area that doesn't show."
The size of the user MAY also be a factor. Think wax toilet gaskets that fail frequently.
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W wrote:

I have successfully used a product called Aquaseal to seal up holes in waterbeds (full of water!), wetsuits, and even the inflatable bladders of buoyancy compensators (the flotation devices used by scuba divers). It has the consistency and appearance of model airplane glue. Smells like model airplane cement too. Curing takes about 12 hours, IIRC.
There is a second product that you can use with the Aquaseal if you want to speed up curing to less than 2 hours: Cotol 240.
http://www.mcnett.com/Aquaseal-Urethane-Repair-Adhesive-Sealant-P234.aspx http://www.mcnett.com/Cotol-240-Cleaner-Cure-Accelerator-P238.aspx
You should be able to find both products in any scuba shop or you can get it from the manufacturer's links.
I believe Aquaseal can solve your problem for you. You can use it either as an adhesive on the seam or to form a new skin directly over a small hole.... which is how I fixed my leaking waterbed.... no steenking patches for me! It's good stuff.
Jay
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