Repairing BB Hole in Window

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... 31 times.
10 P=.5*EXP(17.863-9621/(460+70))'initial cavity vapor pressure ("Hg) 20 W=.62198/(29.921/P-1)'initial humidity ratio (#w/#a) 30 PRINT P,W 40 P10=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+10))'vapor pressure at 10 F and 100% RH 50 W10=.62198/(29.921/P10-1)'10 F humidity ratio 60 W=.95*W'squeeze bellows 70 IF W>W10 THEN N=N+1:GOTO 60 80 PRINT N,W,W10
.3741957 7.87707E-03
31 1.525878E-03 1.536647E-03
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Didn't read the code but that's "simple" fix anybody is just going to have the facilities to do just lying around--right! :(
At first blush it appears assumed totally dry air which wouldn't be likely and doesn't account for mixing so that part of the introduced air will be withdrawn as well as the initial on every cycle.
--
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The parts might cost $25.

Air from a plastic box with a few desiccant bags would be close.

But it does. Read the code... a lot of 3rd graders used to speak BASIC :-)
10 P=.5*EXP(17.863-9621/(460+70))'initial cavity vapor pressure ("Hg) 20 W=.62198/(29.921/P-1)'initial humidity ratio (#w/#a) 30 PRINT P,W 40 P10=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+10))'vapor pressure at 10 F and 100% RH 50 W10=.62198/(29.921/P10-1)'10 F humidity ratio 60 W=.95*W'squeeze bellows 70 IF W>W10 THEN N=N+1:GOTO 60 80 PRINT N,W,W10
.3741957 7.87707E-03
31 1.525878E-03 1.536647E-03
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote: ...

And futzing around for several hours w/ the end result being a partially evacuated window w/ an obvious hole in the middle that undoubtedly won't be a permanent repair...
Meanwhile, $50 or so will put it back to new condition and depending on insurance might conceivably even have some fraction covered.
While an interesting intellectual exercise, just isn't the logical solution unless one is simply into doing stuff like that for the fun of it.
--
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Maybe less, for an aquarium pump and a timer and a little tubing and a plastic box and a few desiccant bags.

Maybe a half-hour :-)

Not, when it's over.

Not, with an indexed-matched clear epoxy.

I just spent $230 for the glass and a few hours labor to replace a fogged sliding glass door panel. 10 P=.5*EXP(17.863-9621/(460+70))'initial cavity vapor pressure ("Hg) 20 W=.62198/(29.921/P-1)'initial humidity ratio (#w/#a) 30 PRINT P,W 40 P10=EXP(17.863-9621/(460+10))'vapor pressure at 10 F and 100% RH 50 W10=.62198/(29.921/P10-1)'10 F humidity ratio 60 W=.95*W'squeeze bellows 70 IF W>W10 THEN N=N+1:GOTO 60 80 PRINT N,W,W10
.3741957 7.87707E-03
31 1.525878E-03 1.536647E-03
^ --- this woulda been 1/0.05 = 20 if there were no air mixing.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote: ...

And I had a double-pane single-lite window done last year for about $50 -- far more nearly what the OP was speaking of.
Since glass is covered under my homeowners at replacement for hail damage, it was nothing out of pocket.
Again, if you're into futzing around w/ stuff, so be it; in general I've more productive/interesting things to do...
--
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Lordy. How many angels can dance on the head of a pin? There is no practical way to field-repair a holed insulated window. OP should wait for next warm dry sunny day when the glass is as hot as it gets, put a dab of epoxy over the hole, and live with the occasional fogging until he can afford to replace the panel.
-- aem sends...
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I disagree :-)

The next COLD day would work better.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

envelope of the house.
-- aem sends....
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Glen Moffitt wrote:

I'd just have the glass parts replaced. Seal is broken and it's no good insulator and it'll fog up when raining or weather gets cold.
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It will eventualy fog so you cant see out of it, if its big you may think insurance. You can seal it with a bit of caulk
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Two approaches.
Replace the double-pane glass. If it's an Andersen they're readily available and not too horrendously priced for a replacement part.
Low-tech, low-cost, under the deck not very visible repair - clear plastic packing tape. It'll be clearer and less obtrusive than any caulk or epoxy repair you can make and you'll have no trouble controlling the depth of the repair. I'd first let the hole sit for a while to make sure that any cracks won't propagate. Then I'd use some silica gel packets (typically found in shoe boxes and electronics packaging) to dry out the air inside the insulated glass unit. Dry the packets in the oven at low temperature for a while, then put the silica packet over the hole and tape plastic over the packet so it will only absorb moisture from inside the hole. Let it sit for a while, then replace the packet with a freshly dried one (quickly!). It should only take a couple or three packets as they're can't be that much moisture inside. Then remove the silica packet and quickly tape over the hole. The edges of the tape are usually what's visible due to handling and ragged edges from cutting it, so you could use an razor knife to cut the tape edges off after it's been burnished down on the glass (don't press too hard). A major benefit is that it's easy to redo the poor-man's dessicant technique if moisture appears between the panes during the winter.
R
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Why not just break open a few of those dessicant packets and push the pellets through the hole into the window cavity? They'll trap the moisture and hold it.
You'll NEVER get the moisture out by taping dessicant packets over the hole.
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My neighbor's boy friend's kids shot mine, it cost about $60USD for a replacement. I took the old sash into the shop and they replaced the glass. This took two trips to the shop. Once for them to measure the glass so they could order the replacement glass and then go back for them to put the glass in the sash.
Jimmie
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Thanks everyone for all the suggestions. I'll probably put a temporary seal on it and then replace it later. Most of the time I'm near it, it's nighttime and I have the blinds down anyway.
Thanks again
On 10/8/08 5:32 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@a29g2000pra.googlegroups.com,

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Some of these windows have lifetime guarantees. Not sure about a BB gun, but it could be worth looking into.
I had a thermal window crack and they sent me replacement panes, no questions asked.
Your window is most likely Argon filled. Without the Argon, the window will be 6% less efficient:
http://www.weathermaster-window.com/glass.html
I don't think there is anything practical you can do about the condensation you will see inside the window.
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Attach a syringe needle to a tube from a tank of argon. Stick it in the hole, and turn on the argon to flush air and moisture from the window. Then seal the hole with epoxy and/or clear tape.
Of course, I've never tried this.
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gee i took my picture window assembly into pittsburgh window and door, its about 4 by 5 feet and cost 80 bucks. they disassembed and reassembled the frame. in by 8am out by 3pm
attemting to fix such a window by patching is a grand waste of time and energy, besides wasting money
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gee i took my picture window assembly into pittsburgh window and door, its about 4 by 5 feet and cost 80 bucks. they disassembed and reassembled the frame. in by 8am out by 3pm
attemting to fix such a window by patching is a grand waste of time and energy, besides wasting money
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Oh come on! Anyone can do that.
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Bob F wrote:

********************************************************************************8
Melt some blow glass and fill the hole with a putty knife.
--
Claude Hopper :)

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