Repairing BB Hole in Window

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wrote:

Hello again,
A replacement may, indeed, be the way to go, but...
I am also eager to understand the situation:
You say "not unless the replacement air is drier."
What replacement air?
As I described, it seems to me that as the heater air expands, and exits through the bb hole, it takes with it some water vapor. That makes it "drier" than it was. Assuming that the epoxy is a seal, would that not decrease the likelihood of condensation?
Thanks,
--
Kenneth

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Kenneth wrote:

"What replacement air?"
Precisely...the air that leaves is simply a small fraction of the same air that's already there. It doesn't "take" any disproportionate amount of water vapor with it, only it's entrained share. Hence, the remaining air (a _very_ tiny fraction less volume, perhaps) is still the same moisture level.
Only unless you can get some mechanism to preferentially remove moisture and/or replace the existing air w/ substantially drier air will it make any difference. Either of those is pretty difficult to do w/o vacuum pump and a source of dry gas, neither of which is likely to be handy.
--
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dpb wrote: ...

... That, of course, is mass, not volume--the volume is fixed only the density decreases slightly owing to the postulated heating...
--
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dpb wrote:

Heating the window from 70 to 100 F at constant pressure increases the air volume by (460+100)/(460+70) = 1.057, ie 5.7% no? How many times must we heat the window to lower the cavity air dew point to 0 F, if it starts at 50% RH and we replace the air that leaves the hole with dry air?
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

A bunch unless you can somehow figure out which new dry air is different from the existing on the subsequent heating cycles.
Just go get the window fixed...
--
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Gee, how could we that? :-)

I disagree.
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

So what's your plan? The heating route certainly isn't very effective.
--
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replying to Kenneth, an angel wrote: I think so too. Do I heat overall window glass from inside or outside where pane is broken. I am a DIY"ER ; its not about money, but what I fix they will break again just to show who is in control. I just like to find answers.
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It seems to me that drawing a vacuum could implode the window.

Or dry the air in the cavity.
Nick
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dpb wrote:

I believe they put desiccant in the separator channels. The air that is sealed in does not have to be absolutely dry.
Otherwise I agree with your comments.
The air in the window will equalize with the outside air. The hole could be sealed when the dew point of the outside air is sufficiently low (below the lowest temperature in winter).
--
bud--

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Correct, and chances are it is ruined because of the moisture that it has already been exposed to. Sealing the hole by whatever means is just gonna lead to fogging/condensation down the road.
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Flushing the window with dry air can also dry out (regenerate) the desiccant, if it's done slowly with a $5 aquarium air pump and a $5 timer.
Nick
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On Oct 11, 7:12�am, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

No the real way to fix this is have the window shipped to orbit on the shuttle, NASA desperate for $$ now offeres this. Astronauts on ISS repair the window in orbit with the special military grade clear epoxy normally used to repair shuttle windows in orbit, Then they take it to hubble to make sure its optically clear return to earth and reinstall.
with total cost of half a million bucks:) you can afford to bulldoze your home and replace with a brand new one:)
geez or spend less thaN A 100 BUCKS FOR A NEW GLASS.
there are companies that come right to your home, do dirty hands necessaryt
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On Oct 11, 7:12am, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

OK, if you say so.
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So how long should he run the dryer with the window in it? I'd recommend the permanent press cycle.
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The way that we used to get moisture out of small inaccessible areas (like a bellows) was to pull a vacuum (which would evaporate the moisture)and basically suck it out. Not a practical solution for this problem but just wanted to add a tidbit on how something like this is handled. MLD
wrote:

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Actually, I think he should draw a vacuum on his window. At about 14 psi, it'll completely destroy the glass and he'll have to replace the window, which is the right "fix" anyway.
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On Wednesday, October 8, 2008 at 2:41:06 PM UTC-4, mike wrote:

ike a

just

Hi there... the correct term is "in.of mercury" for vacuum pressure not psi .
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On 05/04/2016 01:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

L@@K at the date ^
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How about a repetitive partial vacuum and a source of dry air, eg a box full of desiccant bags? How many times do we have to squeeze a bellows to remove 5% of the air from a window cavity, with a check valve and a vacuum breaker that allow dry air to replace expelled air when the bellows is released, if we want to lower the cavity dew point from 50 to 10 F?
Nick
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