Repairing BB Hole in Window

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I have a double-pane window, downstairs on one end of the family room. It's not very visible, being under the rear deck. Someone recently shot a small hole, probably with a BB gun, which penetrated the outer pane. I'm looking for advice on how to seal that up. I googled around, but surprisingly not a lot there. Lots of articles on repairing broken windows or holes in screens, but not this. Could not find anything on Amazon or on the sites of Lowes or Home Depot. Any suggestions?
Thanks in Advance
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You can epoxy over the hole, but it will show, and the seal is blown, so the glass will fog up over time, I would expect.
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replying to Bob F, Marcia fasnacht wrote: I have a single pane window with a BB hole in it! Can I treat it with epoxy also?
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wrote:

Marcia-
Ideally you would replace the pane. You might check with a company that repairs automobile windshields, and see if their process would work on your window.
If you are willing to accept a visible repair, Epoxy might work. I would prefer Silicone Rubber Glue or Sealant. Whichever, I would make sure there was more than enough to fill the hole. After it cured I would slice off the excess with a razor blade.
Fred
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wrote:

resin that works real well for that kind of repair
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replying to clare, an angel wrote: Thanks, I too will try that ; no point in replacement yet, evil is everywhere and I am in the middle of it here. We don't have a black vs. white issue, but sin in all trying to find its way out. Some people have bad attitudes and control issues, get these straightened up and we could have a good America again. People perish for lack of knowledge.
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2016 14:44:01 +0000, Marcia fasnacht

epoxy resins do.
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replying to Bob F, an angel wrote: hi, I really need some help here; in my 70's and two windows with bb holes. one is dry so I intend to try silicone and clear packaging tape. Other is full of moisture; can I use hair dryer or shop vac to get exchange of air through the long cracks without breaking glass to pieces. no point in replacing as yet. I would really appreciate any help, thanks an angel that none seem to like. I don't know much about even doing this, but nothing worthwhile is ever easy. Thanks again
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You can always get one of these for $900 http://www.deltakits.com/windshield-repair-kits/products/3 /
Holes can be filled with resin, but I have no idea how well it works. Maybe a local glass place will have what you need.
If appearance is not critical, I'd use epoxy.
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http://www.deltakits.com/windshield-repair-kits/products/3 /
That is for laminated glass only.
BTW, you can buy a cheapo one shot version at an auto parts store for about $10.00.
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You could patch the hole with clear epoxy, however, since the outside air has got inside, the moisture in the air inside (unless you re in the desert) WILL tend to condense onto the glass from time to time depending on temperature.
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Perhaps we can dry that air. Before plugging the BB hole, we might drill a hole in the glass seal with a tube to an aquarium air pump in a box with a few Tyvek bags filled with desiccant clay...
http://www.uline.com/ProductDetail.asp?model=S-1606&ref 06
Nick
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On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 18:29:55 -0700, Glen Moffitt

Their ideas are good. Don't push it in much or it will run down or reach the other pane, which won't look as good.
You could also use clear silicone cement like from GE. They might have that in a hardware store but will definitely have it in a good autoparts store.
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On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 18:29:55 -0700, Glen Moffitt

Howdy,
You have seen good ideas about epoxy, and I suspect the concerns you have seen about the humidity of the air that entered are correct.
But, you might be able to mitigate the condensation problems if you were to heat the window some before applying the epoxy.
I might try aiming some sort of space heater at the glass for a while before doing the repair.
Even heating it slightly would lower the level of humidity between the panes, and that would, in turn, lower the temperature at which you would see condensation.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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The heat won't remove the moisture in the trapped air, only make it warmer. The moisture would have to escape thru the hole, which won't happen.
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PanHandler wrote:

Anyone tried these guys or similar services which say they drill a hole in the outer pane and put in a one way valve as part of their process?
http://www.defogit.com /
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Dont know nothing about thme but there ad is pure BS. If you have fog in your window the window either leaks or it was not properly prepared when it was made.
Jimmie
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Heating air lowers the RH but doesn't change the absolute moisture content, so the air would have the same dew point after it cooled.
We might dry the air by running a tube from a dessicant box to the hole and cycling the space heater every half hour for a few hours to pump air out and back into the window cavity.
Nick
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On 8 Oct 2008 06:48:04 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Hi Nick,
No Physicist I, but at first, I thought, "Of course... He's absolutely right."
Then, on further reflection, (though I certainly may be wrong) I came to see it differently:
The window used to be a closed vessel (and were that to continue, your comment would, I believe, be correct.)
But now, it is an open vessel (the bb hole.)
Consider the analogy (though far more extreme) to a clothes drier:
It heats the air in the drum, the RH goes down, the water in the clothes is drawn to the air, and that moist air (with the water it carries) is expelled by a fan via the duct.
It would appear to me that much the same thing would happen in the case of the window:
A space heater (or some such) heats the glass of the window, and after a few minutes, heats the air enclosed. As that air warms, at least two things happen. First, as you say, its RH drops. But in addition to that, it expands, expelling some of that air via the bb hole, and with it, the moisture it carries.
It seems to me that over time (and let's remember that the volume of air in the window is extremely low) both the RH, and the absolute humidity of the air in the window would drop.
Then, when the epoxy seals the hole (while the window is still warm) the AH within would be lower than the surrounding environment thus lowering the temperature at which condensation would be visible.
Might I have that right?
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Kenneth wrote: ...

Not unless the replacement air is drier than the air which one is trying to displace -- which it isn't since it would be only some very small fraction of air displaced by the volume expansion of a minimal amount of (localized) heating.
The only way to make any significant difference would be the same way the window was manufactured--draw a vacuum and fill w/ dry gas which ain't gonna' happen.
Only real choice is to get the window repaired/replaced.
--
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